Film and Movies

When a Restaurant Job was Divinely Ordered

Jun 23, 2016

Enjoli Moon is the founder and creative director of the Afrikana Independent Film Festival, which is in its third year and which brings filmmakers to Richmond from all over the world. But Moon doesn't come from the filmmaking world. In this week's segment, she shares her memories of a Richmond restaurant that inspired her to create something new and different in the city.

 

 

Actor for Hire

Feb 9, 2016

With the explosion of cable TV, Netflix and the DVD market, there are more opportunities than ever for actors, but movie-making remains a competitive business – a point underscored with humor by a Fredericksburg native in the new film Actor for Hire.  It was selected to show at 22 film festivals including Virginia’s, where it sold out.  Sandy Hausman reports on the man and the movie. 

Ruff Cut Film Festival Benefits Service Dogs of VA

Oct 15, 2015

You’ve heard of the Cannes Film Festival.  Now, get ready for the Canine Film Festival, an event taking place in Charlottesville this Saturday.  The night’s emcee  is a woman who came up with Stupid Pet Tricks for David Letterman’s show and has made a career by combining canines and comedy.

Merrill Markoe has made the most of her comedic skills and her love of dogs - writing 8 books, including Walking in Circles Before Lying Down.  Markoe knows dogs well.  She has, at times, had eight of them.

Meg Ryan Headlines VA Film Festival

Sep 30, 2015
(Photo by Dario Cantatore/Invision/AP)

The Virginia Film Festival is bringing some big names to Charlottesville this fall.  Sandy Hausman spoke with the event’s director at a preview for the event and  filed this report.

In the summer of 2014, Meg Ryan was in Virginia, directing a film in which she starred, along with Tom Hanks, Sam Shepherd, and her son Jack Quaid.  That film, called Ithaca, is based on William Saroyan’s novel The Human Comedy, and festival director Jody Kielbasa says it will premiere here.

The cable TV series “TURN” will be back in Virginia for another season.  Producers of the historic drama about spies during the American Revolution will get about $6 million in tax dollars from the state.

In Richmond, debate continues over the wisdom of giving incentives to makers of films and TV shows.

Critics say taxpayers should not be bankrolling Hollywood, but Andy Edmund, who heads the film office, disagrees.

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