Federal Government

AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Last week the U-S House was able to pass a long term transportation bill which has businesses across the commonwealth feeling optimistic.

Congress hasn’t passed a long-term transportation bill since 2009. That’s left localities and states reeling from uncertainty as lawmakers have cobbled together dozens of short-term patches. Ask any Virginia lawmaker and they’ll tell you they’ve been getting pressured by local business to pass a long term transportation bill. Here’s Virginia Republican Morgan Griffith.

Virginia’s congressional delegation is divided over a bipartisan budget deal that greatly reduces any chance of a government shutdown for two years. 

Congressional leaders have been secretly negotiating the deal with the White House for weeks, yet most people on Capitol Hill were kept completely in the dark. That’s why when the details were unveiled on Tuesday morning lawmakers had to scramble to understand the deal.

 “It’s the right direction and I got a lot of detail questions that I’m grappling with.”

This month, the world marks the 70th anniversary of the United Nations - an institution founded with the enthusiastic support of a Virginia man now known as the architect of the UN. 

As a student at the University of Virginia, Edward Stettinius fell short on the academic front - too busy, it seems, to complete the coursework needed for a degree. 

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

With a changing of the guard afoot at the U-S Capitol, Speaker John Boehner’s sudden resignation is revealing deep disagreements within the Republican Party...and it's on display in the Virginia congressional delegation.

Virginia seems to have just missed out on having one of the most powerful people in the nation hail from the state. Eric Cantor was the House Majority Leader and was largely seen as Speaker Boehner’s successor until he got ousted in a primary by Dave Brat. Republican Congressman Scott Rigell says the state is feeling Cantor’s loss now. 

Federal Budget Storm Still Brewing

Sep 8, 2015
AP Photo/J. David Ake

Lawmakers were away from Washington all of August, but there was little reason for them to take that extended vacation. They only have until the end of September to fund the government or else the government will shut down.

Remember sequestration? That's those indiscriminate budget cuts that ripped across the military and most every federal agency a few years ago. Two years ago lawmakers were able to get sequestration off the books by reaching a bipartisan budget deal, and Virginia Democratic Senator Mark Warner bemoans that those talks aren’t taking place now. 

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