Federal Government

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Virginia Republicans are trying to derail the global climate change talks in Paris. Matt Laslo reports on the battle raging in Washington that will be felt across Virginia. 

The US Senate recently passed legislation by a slim majority to block the new carbon reduction rules coming from the Environmental Protection Agency. 

Government Shutdown Threats Continue

Nov 16, 2015

  If you thought the threat of a government shutdown was taken off the table, think again. Virginia may once again get caught in the crosshairs of a partisan battle in Washington. 

Before Speaker Boehner retired he worked with President Obama to reach a two year budget agreement. That agreement is the blueprint, but it didn’t come with any dollar bills attached to it. Now that lawmakers have less than a month to actually fund the government, conservatives are trying to use the bill to undo the president’s initiatives, like the EPA’s new Clean Power Plan. 

AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Last week the U-S House was able to pass a long term transportation bill which has businesses across the commonwealth feeling optimistic.

Congress hasn’t passed a long-term transportation bill since 2009. That’s left localities and states reeling from uncertainty as lawmakers have cobbled together dozens of short-term patches. Ask any Virginia lawmaker and they’ll tell you they’ve been getting pressured by local business to pass a long term transportation bill. Here’s Virginia Republican Morgan Griffith.

Virginia’s congressional delegation is divided over a bipartisan budget deal that greatly reduces any chance of a government shutdown for two years. 

Congressional leaders have been secretly negotiating the deal with the White House for weeks, yet most people on Capitol Hill were kept completely in the dark. That’s why when the details were unveiled on Tuesday morning lawmakers had to scramble to understand the deal.

 “It’s the right direction and I got a lot of detail questions that I’m grappling with.”

This month, the world marks the 70th anniversary of the United Nations - an institution founded with the enthusiastic support of a Virginia man now known as the architect of the UN. 

As a student at the University of Virginia, Edward Stettinius fell short on the academic front - too busy, it seems, to complete the coursework needed for a degree. 

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