A food bank and farm in Floyd County will be able to feed a lot more people this year ---and for years to come.

The Roanoke Women’s Foundation awarded a $40,000 grant to “Plenty!” a non-profit farm that grows and collects food for people who need it. Jonathan Vandergrift is the farmer there.  He says the grant will help them reach out to a segment of the community that has, sort of been under the radar. 

Virginia's Oyster Trail

Nov 10, 2015

 Governor McAuliffe traveled to the Northern Neck this week to fire up the Virginia Oyster Trail. 

That’s an initiative he announced last year that connects 250 miles of seafood producers, restaurants, wineries, craft breweries and artisans around the Chesapeake Bay's rural communities. 

Instead of the traditional ribbon-cutting ceremony the governor and his Virginia Oyster Trail team shucked an oyster and slurped.

Nicholas Boullosa,

Interest in the whole ‘farm to table’ movement is growing.  But one aspect of it continues to be controversial in Virginia; direct farm sales of raw, unpasteurized milk.  Some say it should be a personal choice. And others warn, it’s a question of public safety. 

At the farmer’s market in Blacksburg, customers come early for their raw milk so they can get it before it’s gone. Steve Moll, a builder in town is here almost every week.

“Yeah, It’s just so good. It really has flavor and it has cream.  Real cream. I make butter out of it.”

Tobacco People: Beyond the Smoke

Oct 8, 2015
Sarah Hazlegrove

Virginia-and-France based photographer Sarah Hazlegrove has a new exhibit opening Saturday, October 10 at Roanoke’s Taubman Museum of Art. It’s a collection called “Tobacco People".

For many, it may be a very different view of the tobacco world--  as this exhibit culminates a four-year-international journey around the rapidly-disappearing world of tobacco cultivation.

Hazlegrove, whose family owned a tobacco farm in Virginia for 200 years, visited countries where the majority of tobacco is still harvested by hand.

Avian Flu & the Poultry Industry

Jun 22, 2015

You may have noticed that your eggs cost a little more than they did a few weeks back. Those higher prices are associated with the Avian Flu outbreak that's moving from the Midwest. But it potentially could impact a lot more than the cost of eggs.

In 2002 an Avian Flu strain devastated Virginia’s poultry industry and led to the destruction of millions of birds. With this latest strain, just ONE Midwest farm surpassed that number. Virginia State Veterinarian Richard Wilkes says Virginia experts went to assist and assess the situation.