Environmental Protecton Agency

www.epa.gov

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Researchers who flew a drone over the open burning of hazardous waste at an Army ammunition plant in Virginia found arsenic, lead and other pollutants at higher-than-expected levels, according to a draft report obtained by The Associated Press.

Jeff Self / Flickr

 

While the president and Republicans in Washington are calling for fewer environmental regulations, a new poll of Virginians shows support for federal protections of clean air and water.  

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The toxic water crisis in Flint, Michigan has some in South West Virginia wondering about pollution hazards here that may also be underestimated by authorities.

In light of what’s been revealed in Flint they say it’s time to take a closer look at air and water in this region that has been deemed ‘safe,’ but may not be. 

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The permit that allows the Radford Army Ammunitions Plant to burn hazardous waste from firearms outdoors is up for renewal. Community activists see an opportunity to address environmental and health concerns about the open burning – and state regulators see a chance to explore new technology to solve an old problem.

Just a handful of people turned at the Blacksburg Public Library on a recent afternoon for a meeting of the Environmental Patriots of the New River Valley.

photo: Colleen Redman, www.looseleafnotes.com

The Mountain Valley Natural Gas Pipeline that’s being proposed to run through South Western Virginia made a U-Turn when it came to Floyd County. Last fall, the gas companies changed the original route, bypassing the rural county. Company officials have said the protest movement that sprang up in Floyd had nothing to do with their decision, but others believe it made a difference. 

One of them is Mara Robbins, who founded the Preserve Floyd Movement last summer to fight the pipeline. Now, she’s been hired by an Environmental group to continue that work throughout the region.

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