Environment

A look at the natural world around us.

Mountain Valley Pipeline Discussion Group

Plans for three new natural gas pipelines in Virginia have been the source of contention between environmentalists and energy companies.

That debate landed in Richmond, as environmental groups pushed for the repeal of a law that makes it easier for energy companies to survey private land. 
 

George Jones grew up in Giles County on a farm his father bought in 1924.

"This was before the Depression, and he paid for the farm by cutting timber. That was the primary source of his income," says Jones.

Virginia Tech

The water emergency in Flint, Michigan might not have come to light without the work of a team of Virginia Tech researchers.

Toxic levels of lead in the city’s tap water were ignored by officials, until it proved there was a problem. And according to the leader of that team, Flint is just the tip of the iceberg.

Virginia Tech Environmental Engineering Professor Marc Edwards got a call from a distraught mother in Flint Michigan last year.  An EPA employee named Miguel Del Toral had gone out of his way to help her when no one else would listen.

Green Fuel Feeds Virginia's Rural Economy

Jan 13, 2016
Virginia Tech

Every year, Virginia spends a billion dollars on energy from somewhere else – fuel oil, propane or kerosene to heat homes.  Now, farmers in Virginia are growing an alternative fuel – a clean, sustainable grass that promises to keep the cash here in the Commonwealth.  Sandy Hausman has that story.

Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden

Recent record highs this winter may have you seeing green in your garden long before you should.
 

Salvia is a sage plant with bright purple flowers, that usually doesn’t bloom until the middle of summer.

“So it’s really strange that we see it still with some green foliage and those beautiful flowers,” says Grace Chapman Elton, director of horticulture at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.
 

Elton says there are lots of plants she’d expect to be dead this time of year, but aren’t -pointing out another type of Sage, Pineapple Sage.

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

With so many cars on the road this holiday season, it’s easy to see why automobiles account for almost half of the country’s fuel consumption.  But what if cars could recover some of that energy for other uses? An engineering professor at Virginia Tech is working on a way to give cars exactly that kind of ‘energy bump.’

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering Lei Zuo and his team are working on a new kind of shock absorber that would not only enhance a car’s ride, but also create energy just from driving on the road.

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