A look at the natural world around us.

AP Photo/Steve Helber

On Wednesday, Dominion will hold its annual meeting, and some observers expect fireworks, as activist shareholders propose changes in the way the company is run.  The push for more green power was launched by one woman who’s been crusading for years.  

Virginia Public Access Project

An April cold snap all but wiped out the peach crop in Virginia's northern Shenandoah Valley...and there's some confusion about an effort to revive the oyster population off Virginia Beach. Those have been among the most read stories this week at the Virginia Public Access Project's VaNews link on vpap.org.

Virginians Critical of Wood-Burning Energy

Apr 6, 2016
Wikimedia Foundation

This week, a delegation from England is touring Virginia and North Carolina, learning more about wood from area forests being used to fuel power plants in the UK.  The European Union considers wood to be a sustainable energy source and gives countries credit for using it instead of coal, but critics here in Virginia say that’s a big mistake.  

CC0 Public Domain

This part of the nation has long been a hub for pork.  The world’s largest producer, Smithfield, is based in the Commonwealth, and there are as many pigs as people in North Carolina.

In fact, you can trace the history of ham and bacon back to the 1600’s, when settlers arrived from England, but raising pigs in the 21st century is a whole new game.

When Americans think about pig farming, they might think fondly of the children’s classic Charlotte’s web - a tale told on film by the beloved animator Hannah Barbera.

Smithfield is the world’s largest producer of pork in the world – a Virginia-based company with farms and packing plants in the U.S., Poland, Romania along with joint ventures in Mexico. Each year the firm raises 16 million animals, and it buys another 14 million from independent farmers to supply the world with bacon, ham and other products made from pigs.