Environment

Environment
4:35 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Bald Eagle Released

A female bald eagle has been released in the Northern Neck of Virginia after recovering from injuries. Onlookers came for a variety of reasons, some quite personal.

The Wildlife Center of Virginia has become famous for patching up injured bald eagles. A team from the center arrived at the Rappahannock River Wildlife Refuge to an exuberant crowd anxious to witness the bird’s flight back to freedom.

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Business & Industry
12:47 pm
Thu February 28, 2013

Rural Food Deserts

You would think that in a place like Southwestern Virginia, more people would have access to nutritious, locally grown food.  But food deserts are not just an urban problem, they exist here as well.  

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Environment
11:37 am
Wed February 27, 2013

Lava Living

Climate change is forcing some Virginians to consider a move.  Coastal areas and islands like Tangiers are losing land as the sea rises, flooding is more frequent, and hurricanes could be more dangerous than ever.  But for one Virginia couple, natural disasters are no deterrent.  They’ve chosen to live in one of the riskiest places on Earth, on Hawaii's big island, about 3 miles from Pu’u’o’o - a volcanic crater that’s been oozing lava for the last 30 years.



 

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Climate Change
5:17 pm
Mon February 25, 2013

Climate Change & Congress

After being eclipsed by other issues for a couple of years climate change is now back in the spotlight on Capitol Hill. 

Republicans control the U-S House and many oppose taking action to address climate change. In his State of the Union address President Obama opened the door for lawmakers to work with him on the issue but he also laid a line in the sand.

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Environment
10:43 am
Wed February 20, 2013

Meet the Oyster Professor

Oysters were once plentiful on Virginia’s Eastern Shore, but their numbers have fallen dramatically over the last century, due to overfishing, pollution and disease. 

Scientists and watermen are working to bring them back, and the partnership has led to a unique course at the University of Virginia – one taught, in part, by a man who has no PhD but could easily write a dissertation on his beloved bivalves.

Four generations of Biddlecombs have lived on the Eastern Shore, harvesting oysters.  76-year-old Dudley Biddlecomb began work when he was just five years old.  

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