Elections

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Virginia Gubernatorial Hopefuls Gearing up for 2017

May 3, 2016
Creative Commons, Flickr

Are you already tired of the presidential campaign? If Election 2016 has become tiresome, go ahead and start getting ready for Election 2017. That’s right, next year is an election year too — one that’s already taking shape. 

A Richmond judge has ruled a group of Virginia state senators in contempt of court -- for failing to turn over documents that could be helpful in an ongoing lawsuit.

Virginia voters get to weigh in on the presidential contest this week. While some of the state’s congressional delegation have made public endorsements, others are sitting on the sidelines.      

Virginia always matters in general elections, but primaries are a different story. The presidential contests are usually becoming a little more clear by the time commonwealth voters get to weigh in, but this year’s races have thrown all conventional political wisdom out the window, according to Virginia Democratic Senator Mark Warner.

Super Tuesday in Virginia

Feb 29, 2016

Virginia is one of a dozen ‘Super Tuesday’ states voting in their Republican contests tomorrow.  On the Democratic side, we’re one of eleven. And if you’re wondering if your vote counts in such a big election, here’s why it does.  

Virginia Tech Political Science Professor, Caitlin Jewitt is writing a book about the Presidential primaries. She says in this year’s election, Virginians are positioned to see their votes have a real impact on who gets their parties’ nominations.

AP Photo/Steve Helber

A quick round-up of election results for Virginia’s state senate: Republicans maintained control. No incumbents lost. Any seat that was held by a Republican is still held by a Republican. And the same goes for Democrats. Nothing flipped. And, that’s despite big money being spent.

It’s a fairly straightforward calculation: $45 million dollars in campaigning plus low voter turnout equals zero change. Quentin Kidd is a political scientist at Christopher Newport University.

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