Discrimination

Roanoke Celebrates International Women's Day 2016

Mar 3, 2016

International Women’s Day is March 8. It’s a global celebration of women’s rights in the labor movement and the right to vote.

In Roanoke, the Wiese Law Firm is coordinating a celebration of Virginia women, with an event Friday, 3/4/16  at the Taubman Museum from 5 to 9 p.m.

Speakers include:

Judge Jacqueline Talevi, Chief Judge of the General District Courts for the 23rd Judicial District.

Janet Osborne, MD Chief, Gynecology/Oncology at Carilion Clinic (preventative/women's reproductive health)

Medication is exempt from sales tax in Virginia, and one other category could be included in that group if the legislature approves.  Lawmakers are considering a bill to stop taxing feminine hygiene products.

Delegate Mark Keam of Vienna says a female staffer convinced him that the legislature needed to look at a new category of products that women of child-bearing age buy – tampons and sanitary napkins.

In addition to museums, battlegrounds and presidential homes, tourists find history at dozens of plantations that are open to the public. 

Often they learn about the big, elegant homes at the heart of those properties – about the people who lived there, but how do mannerly tour guides introduce the harsh subject of slavery?

Former VA McDonald's Workers File Civil Rights Lawsuit

Jan 22, 2015

Some former workers at three McDonald’s restaurants in South Boston and Clarkesville have filed a federal civil rights  lawsuit against the chain and one of its franchises. 

The ten former workers , nine are African American, one is Hispanic,  allege supervisors subjected them to racial and sexual harassment. 

Rev. Kevin Chandler, president of the South Boston Halifax Chapter of the NAACP says his organization is backing the lawsuit.

Governor McAuliffe marked the 60th anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court decision, Brown versus Board of Education, with a visit to a Richmond high school.

African-American students from Virginia had joined that case in the 1950s after walking out of their racially segregated school in protest of its dilapidated conditions and inferior curriculum.

The governor provided a brief civics lesson—tying issues six decades ago to issues today.

Pages