Automobiles

A New Life for Off Lease Cars

Nov 7, 2017

People who track the automotive industry predict at least two significant disruptions in the years to come – self–driving and electric cars, and in a small Virginia city there’s a third change underway – one that could have a big impact on the used car market. 

Mallory Noe-Payne / RADIOIQ

 

 

More than ten years ago, a small team of students and engineers from Virginia Tech won big at a national contest for software that allowed a car to drive all on its own.

 

That technology has since grown into a successful Blacksburg-based company that’s on the cutting edge of self-driving technology.

The Cars of the Future are Already Here

Jun 11, 2015
Virginia Tech, Center for Automated Vehicle Systems

Researchers will soon begin testing automated cars on Virginia Roadways. But the advent of truly driverless cars is still pretty far down the road.

On the outside this looks like any normal Cadillac SRX a sleek, a 2013 luxury SUV.  But it’s been retrofitted with screens and sensors.  A small antenna on top with a GPS and Wi-Fi receiver detecting obstacles ahead, in this case, a tester wearing what looks like a construction worker’s vest containing a transmitter. 

Touting the Tiny Car

Apr 28, 2015

With gasoline prices well below three dollars a gallon, large, gas-guzzling vehicles are again selling well.  Last year’s top three were full-sized pick-up trucks that get less than 20 miles to the gallon in city driving.  Jim Phelan doesn’t care. 

The Charlottesville man has fallen in love with something that gets 55 miles to the gallon, and he hopes to sell others on a car most people have never heard of.

There was a time when a license plate simply identified a car, its owner and, in many cases, if it was on the road legally. But now, with advancing technology, it's much more—and a lot of people don't like it.  

Recent published reports indicate that police departments are using license plate scanners without the public’s knowledge—and even when people haven't committed an infraction. 

Lawmakers are trying to decide exactly what police departments and other agencies can do with that information.

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