Art and Museums


There’s big excitement in Richmond over a surprising find - a work of art that carries an important message from the cradle of Western civilization.  Here’s what the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts bought from a dealer in London. 

In modern times, it’s common to hear conversations about race relations, but less is known about how people who looked different got along in ancient times. 

Now comes a work of art that offers an important clue. Peter Schertz is a curator at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

Garden Week in Virginia

Apr 22, 2015
Collection Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam,

It’s Garden Week in Virginia, with visitors invited to stop by more than 250 gardens, homes and historic landmarks, but something surprising is happening in Richmond. 

About 30,000 people have opted to go inside– to check out the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts’ show of floral paintings by Van Gogh, Manet, Matisse, Renoir and other 19th century masters. 

Like other forms of fashion, styles of facial hair come and go.  Today, beards are back -- and a history museum in Richmond is celebrating by pairing modern-day men with Civil War generals who look something like them in an exhibition called “Beard Wars.” 

The Show at Richmond’s Valentine History Center features photos of union and confederate generals, side by side with members of the RVA Beard League - a philanthropic group that celebrates whiskers.

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts has collected the works of hundreds of artists, but it wants to make sure the talent keeps coming. That’s why they’ve again awarded thousands of dollars in fellowships to 26 student and professional artists.

For 75 years, the VMFA has lent support to artists -- $4,000 for undergraduates, $6,000 for graduate students and $8,000 for professionals, and some people have won all three – among them, Lexington painter Cy Twombly and filmmaker Vince Gilligan who went on to make Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul.

Aldine S. Hartman Endowment Fund

When it comes to ethnicity, the largest group of people in Virginia—about 20% -- trace their ancestry back to Africa, but kids in our schools learn relatively little about African history, arts and culture.  Now, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts will offer a lively supplement to the curriculum -- taking children on a virtual trip to Mali, Ghana and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.