WVTF Classics

Join Classical 24 hosts Jeff Essworthy and Lynn Warfel, as well as WVTF's own Kevin Sanders for the best in classical music every day and night. 

You can catch WVTF's Classical Programming during these times:

Monday - Thursday: 12 AM - 5 AM; 10 AM - 3 PM; 10 PM - 12 AM

Friday: 12 AM - 5 AM; 10 AM - 3 PM

Saturday: 12 AM - 7 AM; 10 PM - 12 AM

Sunday: 12 AM - 6 AM

There's a musical asterisk on French president-elect Emmanuel Macron's bio: He is an avid amateur pianist. It's a facet of his life occasionally noted in passing, as in this piece from the French radio network Europe 1 titled "The Things You Don't Yet Know About Emmanuel Macron." Along with mentioning his abiding fondness for karaoke, Europe 1 reported that he studied piano for 10 years at the music conservatory in Amiens, where he won third prize.

Another day, another study undercutting the myth surrounding the 18th-century Italian violin maker Antonio Stradivari.

Since the early 20th century, musicians and instrument experts have been trying to figure out what, if anything, makes the violins he made sound better.

Although more women have been winning Pulitzer Prizes for music lately, it's still next to impossible to hear works by female composers performed by America's symphony orchestras.

This year's Pulitzer winner, Du Yun, has a lot to say about the situation.

Conductor Gustavo Dudamel — one of the most famous Venezuelans in the world today and one of the world's most prominent classical musicians — issued an open letter today to the president and government in his native country.

Long reticent to address politics directly, he has published his comments in a letter titled "Levanto Mi Voz / I Raise My Voice," in both Spanish and English. (The full text is below, in both languages.)

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