TED Radio Hour on RADIO IQ & WVTF

Saturdays at 2:00pm

Ted Radio Hour on RADIO IQ & RADIO IQ With BBC News Saturday afternoons at 2:00 and WVTF Tuesday evenings at 7:30.

A journey through fascinating ideas, astonishing inventions and new ways to think and create. Each episode includes riveting excerpts from the renowned TED stage where some of the world's deepest thinkers and innovators are invited to give the 18-minute "talk of their lives." The Ted Radio Hour team takes the most compelling talks and organizes them around a common theme. But we don't stop with the TEDTalks. Host Guy Raz interviews the guests, delving deeper, dissecting the speaker's ideas and posing probing questions you’d like to hear answered.

Topics the series explores include mankind's place in the universe and space, how the sounds around us affect our behavior and why there is power in failure.

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Program Headlines

  • Friday, August 29, 2014 1:13am

    Learning is an integral part of human nature. But why do we — as adults — assume learning must be taught, tested and reinforced? Why do we put so much effort in making kids think and act like us? In this hour, TED speakers explore the different ways babies and children learn on their own — from the womb, to the playground, to the web. Education researcher Sugata Mitra explains how he brought self-supervised access to the web for children in India’s slums and villages — with results that have made him rethink teaching. Science writer Annie Murphy Paul discusses how fetuses begin taking cues from the outside world while still in the womb. Developmental psychologist Alison Gopnik argues that like scientists, babies and young children follow a sophisticated systematic process of exploration when they play. Veteran teacher Rita Pierson says children need relationships and human connection in order to be inspired to learn. Sugata Mitra returns later in the episode to talk about his vision to build a school in a cloud where children drive a new kind of self-organized classroom.

  • Friday, August 22, 2014 7:50am

    We try so hard to be perfect, to never make mistakes and to avoid failure at all costs. But mistakes happen. And when they do, how do we deal with being wrong? In this episode, TED speakers look at those darker moments in our lives, and consider why sometimes we need to make mistakes and face them head on. Dr. Brian Goldman tells a profound story about the first big mistake he made in the ER, and questions medicine's culture of denial. Professor Brené Brown explains how important it is to confront shame. Also, jazz composer Stefon Harris argues that a lot of our actions are seen as mistakes only because we don't react to them appropriately. Plus, Margaret Heffernan, the former CEO of five businesses, tells the story of two unexpected collaborators, and how good disagreement is central to progress.

  • Wednesday, August 20, 2014 10:28am

    This recording of "Beauty and the Brain," a session hosted by Guy Raz at TED 2014, brings popular speakers back to the TED stage with updates on their work and personal lives.  Tierney Thys talks about how being in the natural world engages your brain; Dan Gilbert discusses why we so often make decisions that our future selves regret; Jane McGonigal explores a video game that is better than morphine at relieving pain; seventeen-year-old Taylor Wilson details his progress on the nuclear reactor he built in his garage; and Jill Bolte Taylor, the neuro-scientist who lived through a stroke, explains how her life has changed since her TED Talk went viral. 

  • Friday, August 15, 2014 1:33am

    We all want to find happiness, but it seems elusive. Can we learn more about happiness through science? Or are there simpler ways to achieve it? Host Guy Raz feels happy listening to Pharrell’s song “Happy”, so Guy asked Pharrell to share his ideas on happiness. Then we hear from five TED speakers who contemplate different paths to finding happiness. Researcher Matt Killingsworth says we're often happiest when we're lost in the moment. Journalist Carl Honore believes our society's emphasis on speed erodes our quality of life. Writer Graham Hill makes the case for taking up less space.  Psychologist Dan Gilbert challenges the idea that we’ll be miserable if we don’t get what we want.  Brother David Steindl-Rast reflects on slowing down, looking where you’re going, and being grateful.

  • Friday, August 8, 2014 1:26am

    Violence and brutality are grim realities of life. So why are some people violent, and others aren’t? Are some of us born that way, or can anyone be pushed into committing acts of cruelty? What would it take for an ordinary person to become violent? In this hour, TED speakers explore the sinister side of human nature, and whether we’re all capable of violence. Psychologist Philip Zimbardo tells the story of his notorious Stanford Prison experiment and how easy it is for people to turn violent. Neuroscientist Jim Fallon uncovers the wiring of a psychopathic killer. Writer Leslie Morgan Steiner tells the harrowing story of her abusive relationship, and shares why victims of domestic violence often don’t leave. Psychology professor Steven Pinker charts the whole of human history, and says we are living in the most peaceful time in our existence.