TED Radio Hour

Saturdays at 2:00pm
Guy Raz

Ted Radio Hour is a journey through fascinating ideas, astonishing inventions and new ways to think and create. Each episode includes riveting excerpts from the renowned TED stage where some of the world's deepest thinkers and innovators are invited to give the 18-minute "talk of their lives." The Ted Radio Hour team takes the most compelling talks and organizes them around a common theme. But we don't stop with the TEDTalks. Host Guy Raz interviews the guests, delving deeper, dissecting the speaker's ideas and posing probing questions you’d like to hear answered.

Topics the series explores include mankind's place in the universe and space, how the sounds around us affect our behavior and why there is power in failure.

Program Headlines

  • Friday, March 27, 2015 12:33am
    Does something serious happen when we play? In this episode, TED speakers describe how all forms of amusement — tossing a ball to video games — can make us smarter, saner and more collaborative. Comedian Charlie Todd and his group Improv Everywhere choreograph bizarre, hilarious and unexpected public scenes, creating whimsical opportunities for total strangers to play together. Dr. Stuart Brown says humor, games, roughhousing and fantasy are more than just fun; humans are hard-wired to play. He came to this conclusion after conducting some somber research about the stark childhoods of murderers. Primatologist Isabel Behncke explains how bonobo apes learn by constantly playing. She says play isn't frivolous; it appears to be a critical way to solve problems and avoid conflict. When video game researcher Jane McGonigal was bedridden after a concussion, she gave herself a prescription: play a game. She says games helped her get better; and for many of us, virtual games can improve our real lives.
  • Friday, March 20, 2015 12:33am
    Even the most original ideas are essentially remixes. When is copying flattery, when is it thievery, and when is it sheer genius? In this hour, TED speakers explore how sampling, borrowing, and riffing make all of us innovators. Sampling music isn't about "hijacking nostalgia wholesale," says DJ Mark Ronson. It's about inserting yourself into the narrative of a song while also pushing that story forward. Filmmaker Kirby Ferguson says nothing is original and that our most celebrated creators steal ideas — and transform them into something new. Clothing designs aren't protected by copyright --and the industry benefits by being more innovative, says Johanna Blakley. People often credit their ideas to individual "Eureka!" moments. But writer Steven Johnson shows how history tells a different story.
  • Friday, March 13, 2015 12:33am
    We communicate with each other in all sorts of ways, spoken and unspoken. But how did the origins of language influence action, and can words actually change human behavior, even alter the course of history? In this hour, TED speakers reflect on how our words and methods of communication affect us, more than you might expect. Linguist John McWhorter says that texting has come of age with such speed and force that it's created an entirely new language within a generation. Biologist Mark Pagel believes our complex language system is a piece of "social technology", simply created to help us get things done. Teacher Phuc Tran tells a personal story of how being caught in a world between the subjunctive and indicative tense — yes, grammar — helped him find his identity. Etymologist Mark Forsyth shares the surprising backstory of the word "president." Social psychologist Amy Cuddy explains how "power posing" can affect our brains, and might even have an impact on our success.
  • Friday, March 6, 2015 12:33am
    Math intimidates a lot of us, but it can deliver surprising answers to life's most pressing questions. In this episode, TED speakers discuss the elegant simplicity, and giddy complexity, of solving for X. Writer Randall Munroe doesn't love math, but has made a career out of solving equations. By answering outlandish hypotheticals, he uses numbers as a playground for the imagination. Polymath Terry Moore wondered why "X" is the universal unknown in Algebra. He dove into the history of numbers to come up with an unexpected answer. Percussionist Clayton Cameron dissects the mathematics of improvisational jazz, discovering how numerical patterns make him a better musician. Entrepreneur and artist Kevin Slavin shows how algorithms can reshape finance, culture and physical environments, with potentially harmful consequences. Mathematician Hannah Fry says math can help you find love. Using mathematical models, she explains how to find an ideal mate and the secret to maintaining a healthy relationship.
  • Friday, February 27, 2015 12:30am
    Success has become synonymous with financial wealth, influence and status. But can we define success in another way — one that welcomes a broader range of accomplishment? It may not be as obvious as you think. In this hour, TED speakers share ideas for what makes us successful. Life coach Tony Robbins describes why failure should not be an option. Psychologist Angela Lee Duckworth says "grit", not IQ, is the new predictor of success. Mike Rowe encourages us not to follow our passion. Ron Gutman shares some compelling research on the hidden power of smiling. And writer Alain de Botton shares a fascinating view about the American paradigm for success and failure.