Talk of the Nation on RADIO IQ & RADIO IQ With BBC News

Discontinued by NPR but shows are available at npr.org

Talk of the Nation on RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News links the headlines with what's on people's minds, providing a springboard for listeners and experts to exchange ideas and pose critical questions about major events in the news and the world around them. Each day, Talk of the Nation combines the award-winning resources of NPR News with the vital participation of listeners. The result is a spirited and productive exchange of knowledge and insight that delves deeply into the news and ideas of the day.

Monday through Thursday, host Neal Conan invites callers to discuss areas of topical interest, including politics and public service, education, religion, music, and healthcare.  On Friday, it's Talk of the Nation Science Friday with host Ira Flatow.

Talk of the Nation and Talk of the Nation Science Friday going behind the headlines with decision-makers, authors, thinkers, artists, scientists, researchers, and listeners around Virginia, the nation and the world, who become part of the conversation by calling 1-800-989-TALK.

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NPR Story
1:24 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

For Babies, It's Better To Like What I Like

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 1:45 pm

Babies as young as nine months appear to approve of people who like what they like — and approve of being mean to those who don't share their tastes. Kiley Hamlin, lead author of a study in the journal Psychological Science, discusses the importance of similarity to young children.

NPR Story
1:24 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

Scientists Search For Gulf War Illness Answers

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 2:14 pm

Transcript

JOHN DANKOSKY, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm John Dankosky. Ira Flatow is out this week. Last December, Steven Coughlin, an epidemiologist at the Veterans Affairs Office of Public Health, resigned his position. And last week he told a congressional subcommittee why. He had serious ethical concerns about the research being done on Gulf War Illness at the VA.

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NPR Story
1:24 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

Grand Central: An Engine Of Scientific Innovation

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 2:12 pm

In his book Grand Central: How A Train Station Transformed America, New York Times urban affairs correspondent Sam Roberts writes of the scientific innovations pioneered at New York City's Grand Central Terminal, such as electric commuter trains and standardized time.

Science
2:12 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

The Abnormally Normal Science Of Sinkholes

In the spring of 1981, a woman's house and part of a car dealership were swallowed by a sinkhole in Winter Park, Fla.
AP

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 2:58 pm

When a Florida man vanished into a massive sinkhole that opened underneath his bedroom in February, the case garnered national attention. Every so often, tragedies like this put sinkholes in the spotlight.

Researchers say that minor sinkholes occur all the time around the world without much notice.

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NPR Story
2:11 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

With Limited Resources, High Poverty, Turning Schools Around

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 4:46 pm

How much can you change a school in one academic year? That question threads through the PBS special 180 Days: A Year Inside An American High School. The documentary, which premieres March 25, follows the day-to-day struggles facing the administrators, teachers and students at Washington Metropolitan High School, an alternative school in Washington, D.C.

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