PRI's The World

Weekdays at 3pm on RADIO IQ

PRI's The World is a one-hour, weekday radio news magazine offering a mix of news, features, interviews, and music from around the globe. Launched in 1996, PRI's The World, a co-production of WGBH/Boston, Public Radio International, and the BBC World Service. The World's coverage is provided by a global network of international journalists. The program also has access to the 250 BBC correspondents located around the world. Unique in public radio, this network works in concert with the program's multinational team of producers and editors, and brings an exceptional depth of understanding and freshness of perspective to the program content. The result is an award-winning hour of breaking news, in-depth features, hard-hitting commentaries, and thought-provoking interviews found nowhere else in U.S. news coverage. PRI's The World -- international news for an American audience.

If you're poor and British, best not to marry a foreigner

14 minutes ago
Toby Melville

Controversial rules preventing thousands of British citizens from living in the UK with their non-European spouses have been upheld in a legal ruling today.

Under the rules, mixed-nationality married couples are forbidden to live in the UK if the British spouse receives an annual salary less than 18,600 pounds ($23,140). Other forms of income, or money earned by the foreign partner, are not considered.

The rules do not apply to couples in which the foreign partner is a citizen of a European Union country, or the foreign partner has a visa for other reasons.

I knew the real Jane Roe

5 hours ago

I sat in the car for three hours while Norma McCorvey, the face of the abortion-rights movement, was in the process of becoming Norma McCorvey, the face of the anti-abortion movement. 

Little did I know that while she had me wait in the car, she was washing away her past. McCorvey died this past weekend. She was 69. 

Her recent passing brought me back to that pivotal moment in the car with McCorvey.

She called me a few days earlier, wanting me to meet her in the parking lot of a woman's clinic where she once worked. 

Thaer al-Tahli has spent three years trying to make it to the United States. He's finally giving up the dream.

Al-Tahli is a familiar face in Amman, Jordan. He's a television news anchor and a Syrian in exile. The 29-year-old supported the uprising against President Bashar al-Assad. As an activist, he organized demonstrations and set up a student union at his university in Homs.

That didn't please the Syrian regime.

Joshua Roberts/Reuters 

Scott Pruitt, in his first address to staff since he took over as head of the Environmental Protection Agency, urged civility and said he would “listen, learn and lead.” 

“We ought to be able to get together and wrestle through some very difficult issues and do so in a civil manner,” Pruitt told staffers Tuesday at the EPA headquarters in Washington, DC.

Signaling a shift in the agency’s priorities, Pruitt focused his remarks on creating a pro-business, regulatory environment rather than cleaning up air or water.

With 200 museums in greater Paris, newcomers face tough competition.

The privately run Phono Museum, which opened in 2014, guides visitors through the history of recorded sound. But it has struggled to overcome financial problems, despite a collection full of old and sometimes bizarre artifacts of audio history.

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