PRI's The World

Weekdays at 3pm on RADIO IQ

PRI's The World is a one-hour, weekday radio news magazine offering a mix of news, features, interviews, and music from around the globe. Launched in 1996, PRI's The World, a co-production of WGBH/Boston, Public Radio International, and the BBC World Service. The World's coverage is provided by a global network of international journalists. The program also has access to the 250 BBC correspondents located around the world. Unique in public radio, this network works in concert with the program's multinational team of producers and editors, and brings an exceptional depth of understanding and freshness of perspective to the program content. The result is an award-winning hour of breaking news, in-depth features, hard-hitting commentaries, and thought-provoking interviews found nowhere else in U.S. news coverage. PRI's The World -- international news for an American audience.

Fear has not paralyzed Pakistan

2 hours ago
Akhtar Soomro/Reuters

I recently visited Pakistan after 25 years. Given the long absence, it essentially felt like my first time there. Only faint, isolated images remained from earlier trips.

Despite this, Pakistan's presence has endured in my life not merely because my parents were born there. Conversations with and stories of family members who still reside there maintain the country's presence in my daily thoughts. And an ardent passion for Pakistani cricket, cultivated in my childhood, ensures a continual bond.

Jason Margolis

The semiarid Mexican city of Monterrey has two major challenges with water: either there is not enough of it, or there's far too much.

Improving and fixing the area’s infrastructure could cost billions. But a US environmental organization has a far cheaper solution, and it’s getting rival corporations — like Coca-Cola and PepsiCo — to come together to pay for it.

Murad Sezer/Reuters

At Mehmet and Pinar Ozcelebi’s basement home, it’s 8 in the evening. As their two daughters, Ada and Nisa, play with their neighbor girls, the couple watches TV. The family tunes into “Cesur ve Guzel,” The Brave and the Beautiful, one of the latest popular Turkish soap operas.

It’s like Turkey’s Dynasty, a story of secrets, revenge and a mysterious man chasing a rich, pretty woman. The male lead played by Turkish heartthrob Kivanc Tatlitug pursues the female lead played by actress diva Tuba Buyukstun. But he has a vendetta against her father. And the plot thickens and unravels.

Sarmad Gilani was working at Google’s offices in San Francisco one morning when he received a message that two cops were waiting for him in Google’s lobby.

The 31-year-old software engineer at Google figured the officers just wanted to talk about an unpaid parking ticket. But Gilani also wondered if the officers had a more complicated motive.

“Just in case they throw me in Guantanamo, please bail me out,” he told a co-worker.

Courtesy of the Bailey family

A controversial child trafficking trial starts this Thursday for a 64-year-old American woman who throughout the late 1990s and early 2000s placed hundreds of Guatemalan children with American families. If convicted, she could face more than a decade in prison.

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