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Renee Montagne, David Greene , Tab O'Neal
Tab O'Neal, Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country and that's certainly also true at WVTF and RADIO IQ. A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA along with our own Tab O'Neal who provides news updates, weather and traffic information from our main broadcast center in Roanoke. Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system. Morning Edition airs weekdays from 5:00-9:00 on WVTF with an added hour from 9:00-10:00 on our RADIO IQ signals.

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NPR Story
5:12 am
Thu January 15, 2015

Paris Neighborhood Becomes Breeding Ground For Militant Jihadists

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 3:14 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Asia
5:12 am
Thu January 15, 2015

American Film On A Tibetan Migrant Finds Unlikely Success — In China

Zanta now lives on the outskirts of Beijing.
Courtesy of Jocelyn Ford

Originally published on Thu January 15, 2015 7:40 pm

An American filmmaker has made a documentary on Tibet. Those two elements alone might seem grounds for China's Communist Party to ban it, but instead the film — Nowhere to Call Home — quietly has been making the rounds in China and winning praise from local audiences.

The reason? The film is an even-handed, deeply personal story that steers clear of politics. Journalist Jocelyn Ford spent years documenting the life of Zanta, a Tibetan migrant who fled her poor, mountain village to build a life for herself and her son in Beijing.

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Business
5:12 am
Thu January 15, 2015

Federal Watchdog To Let Teamsters Union Off Its Leash

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 3:31 pm

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NPR Story
5:12 am
Thu January 15, 2015

Were Paris Attacks Coordinated Between ISIS And Al-Qaida?

Originally published on Fri January 16, 2015 3:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Middle East
5:12 am
Thu January 15, 2015

In Jordan, The Comic Book Superheroes Fight Extremism

Comic book creator Suleiman Bakhit says he found that many kids did not have heroes to look up to and sometimes gravitated to religious extremists. This frame is from his story about a Jordanian special forces hero.
Courtesy of Suleiman Bakhit

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 3:34 pm

We've been hearing a lot about cartoons for all the wrong reasons recently: the horrifying attack on Charlie Hebdo in Paris, the divisive images, the threat of extremism. But one man in Jordan has been using comic book superheroes to try to bridge the divide and curb extremism.

His name is Suleiman Bakhit, and at a bar in Jordan's capital, Amman, he cracks open his laptop to show off some heroes. The artwork is sophisticated, vivid and influenced by Japanese comics.

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