Morning Edition on WVTF/RADIO IQ

Weekdays from 5:00 to 9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ, until 10:00 on RADIO IQ.

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country and that's certainly also true at WVTF and RADIO IQ.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA along with our own Tab O'Neal who provides state and regional news updates, weather and traffic information from our main broadcast center in Roanoke.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Morning Edition airs weekdays from 5:00-9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ with an added hour from 9:00-10:00 on our RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News networks of signals.

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Around the Nation
5:09 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Despite A History Of Twisters, Moore, Okla., Keeps Growing

Max Alvarez (left) and Hollan Corliss construct a new home in Moore, Okla., to replace one that was destroyed in May 2013. More than 300 new homes have been built since the tornado, in addition to the 1,100 that are being rebuilt.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 12:08 pm

One year ago Tuesday, a violent tornado obliterated the city of Moore, Okla., killing 24 residents and leaving nearly 400 injured among the razed homes and businesses. It was the third violent tornado to strike the city in the past 15 years. But rather than move away, residents have stayed put in Moore — and more and more are actually moving here.

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NPR Story
5:09 am
Tue May 20, 2014

U.S. Files Charges Against Chinese Officials Over Cyberspying

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 11:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

It was an extraordinary moment yesterday when the U.S. indicted members of China's military, charging them with stealing commercial secrets from American companies. The Department of Justice even displayed classic wanted posters with their photos, posters now displayed prominently on the FBI website.

To find out how this is playing out in China, we turned to NPR's Shanghai correspondent, Frank Langfitt. Good morning.

FRANK LANGFITT, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

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Around the Nation
7:10 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Rice Finds 'Purrfect' Angle To Recruit High School QB

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 7:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A recruiting letter was catnip to a high school football star in Texas. Quarterback J.T. Granato said yes to Rice University after getting a pitch in the mail. It was actually addressed not to J.T. but to his cat. A coach at Rice knew Granato loved his cat so he wrote to Kitty: I know you'd like to keep him close so he can feed you and change the litter box.

Please help us get him to choose us. Paw if you have any questions. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Global Health
6:44 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Mosquito-Borne Breaking Bone Disease Spreads In Haiti

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 10:20 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

A mosquito-borne virus is spreading across the Caribbean. It's called Chikungunya. It's hardly ever fatal but it does hurt, causing severe joint pain. And public health officials expect the disease to eventually reach the U.S. Reporter Peter Granitz takes us to Haiti, the country with the most recent confirmed outbreak.

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Research News
6:36 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Why Reporting On Scientific Research May Warp Findings

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 7:46 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Next we're going to report on scientific research, in particular on the way that reporting on scientific research might actually warp the findings. Scientists face pressure to publish new discoveries, which in turn might influence what they study, and that, of course, is not necessarily a good thing. There's work being published today that's part of an effort to fix this problem. NPR's Shankar Vendantam joined our colleague, Steve Inskeep, to talk about it.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Shankar, welcome back.

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