Morning Edition on WVTF/RADIO IQ

Weekdays from 5:00 to 9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ, until 10:00 on RADIO IQ.

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country and that's certainly also true at WVTF and RADIO IQ.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA along with our own Tab O'Neal who provides state and regional news updates, weather and traffic information from our main broadcast center in Roanoke.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Morning Edition airs weekdays from 5:00-9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ with an added hour from 9:00-10:00 on our RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News networks of signals.

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Middle East
6:21 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Syria's Move To Join Chemical Treaty Puts Pressure On Israel

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 8:24 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

World leaders are convening in New York this week for the United Nations' General Assembly. And among other things, they're facing some potentially dramatic changes in arms control in the Middle East. Syria might give up it chemical weapons. Iran is signaling that it might negotiate with the West over its nuclear plans. From Jerusalem, NPR's Emily Harris looks at how this might affect Israel and its own weapons programs.

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World
6:12 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Pakistan, Iraq See Uptick In Suicide Bombings

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 10:35 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On a Monday morning, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. The siege of a Kenyan shopping mall was one of several spectacular acts of violence over the weekend. Each act only highlighted a long-running conflict that has continued for years somewhere off in our peripheral vision.

GREENE: The Somali group Al-Shabab claims responsibility for the attack on a mall in Kenya. Gunshots and explosions continued there today, on the third day of the siege.

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Movies
5:54 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Disney Experiments With 2-Screen Experience Involves iPads

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 5:35 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

I don't know about you, but I'm a little troubled when I hear about people who watch multiple screens. You know what I'm talking about. Maybe you're watching a movie at home while live tweeting, or while keeping track at a ballgame. At least movie theaters are a sacred space, immune to these changes.

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Television
5:52 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Small-Screen Stars Honored At Emmy Awards

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 3:00 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The stars of the small screen strode down the red carpet last night, to attend the Emmy Awards.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

"How I Met Your Mother" star Neil Patrick Harris was the host. Here's how we met him.

(SOUNDBITE OF EMMY AWARDS BROADCAST)

NEIL PATRICK HARRIS: Welcome to the 65th Primetime Emmy Awards. Tonight we celebrate the best of television. For our younger audience, that's the thing you watch on your phones.

(AUDIENCE LAUGHTER)

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Around the Nation
4:51 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Most Agree 'Welfare For Farmers' Has To Go

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 10:35 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

As if the battle over the budget as well as the looming fight over the debt ceiling were not enough, there's a Farm Bill. Congress extended the Farm Bill after the fiscal cliff deal in January, but that extension expires at the end of the month. Congress is bitterly divided on food stamps and other issues. But both parties agree on something: The $5 billion-a-year farm subsidy called direct and countercyclical payments must go.

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