Morning Edition on WVTF/RADIO IQ

Weekdays from 5:00 to 9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ, until 10:00 on RADIO IQ.

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country and that's certainly also true at WVTF and RADIO IQ.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA along with our own Tab O'Neal who provides state and regional news updates, weather and traffic information from our main broadcast center in Roanoke.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Morning Edition airs weekdays from 5:00-9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ with an added hour from 9:00-10:00 on our RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News networks of signals.

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Sports
5:13 am
Tue August 27, 2013

USA Swimming To Review Sexual Misconduct Prevention Program

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The sport of swimming is back in the news, with new questions being raised about whether swimming has effectively confronted a sexual abuse problem, a problem that's been revealed in recent years. USA Swimming - the sport's governing body in this country - announced an independent review of Safe Sport, their organization's program to protect athletes from sexual abuse. NPR's Tom Goldman reports.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: In the spring of 2010, swimming's secrets emerged in a flurry of media reports.

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Latin America
5:02 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Thousands Of Striking Teachers Disrupt Mexico City

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 5:17 am

The teachers are protesting education changes that would institute evaluations and reduce the power of unions in hiring educators. It's common practice for teachers in Mexico to buy and sell tenured positions. The protests in Mexico City have caused traffic mayhem, and at one point blocked access to the international airport.

Around the Nation
5:02 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Residents Of Hot Weather States Sweat Air Conditioning Bills

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Air conditioning is increasingly becoming a necessity, not a luxury, as the number of Americans living in the Sunbelt grows. In Arizona, many people are struggling to keep up with their utility bills. The federal government does have an energy assistance program, but funding is shrinking, and it favors cold weather states that need heating help.

From member station KJZZ in Phoenix, Jude Joffe-Block reports.

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Business
5:02 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Amgen To Buy Onyx In $10.4 Billion Deal

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 5:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a major biotech deal.

Amgen, the world's largest biotech company, is buying Onyx Pharmaceuticals for nearly $10.5 billion.

As NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports, Amgen has high hopes for Onyx's cancer drugs.

WENDY KAUFMAN, BYLINE: Amgen has cancer-related medicines, but for the most part they relieve side effects of chemotherapy, they don't act on the cancer itself.

And analyst Mark Schoenebaum of the stock research firm ISI Group says Amgen wanted a piece of that action.

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The Salt
3:03 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Turning Off The Spigot In Western Kansas Farmland

An irrigation pivot waters a corn field in Nebraska. Many farmers in Nebraska and Kansas rely on irrigation to water their corn fields. But the underground aquifer they draw from will run dry.
Nati Harnik AP

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 2:49 pm

Across the High Plains, many farmers depend on underground stores of water, and they worry about wells going dry. A new scientific study of western Kansas lays out a predicted timeline for those fears to become reality. But it also shows an alternative path for farming in Kansas: The moment of reckoning can be delayed, and the impact softened, if farmers start conserving water now.

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