Morning Edition on RADIO IQ

Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne, Tab O'Neal

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country and that's certainly also true at WVTF and RADIO IQ.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA along with our own Tab O'Neal who provides state and regional news updates, weather and traffic information from our main broadcast center in Roanoke.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Morning Edition airs weekdays from 5:00-9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ with an added hour from 9:00-10:00 on our RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News networks of signals.

Local Host(s): 
Tab O'Neal
Composer ID: 
5187f8cae1c84d4a4b125657|5187f8c5e1c84d4a4b12563e

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National Security
10:43 am
Mon June 24, 2013

For Edward Snowden, A Convoluted Path To Possible Asylum

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:55 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Russia's decision to allow Edward Snowden into the country was just one more step in what appears to be a convoluted path to possible asylum. As we've just heard, Snowden is not on the flight to Cuba he was scheduled to take from Moscow. But more on the latest we are looking at, we are joined in the studio by NPR's Dina Temple-Raston. Good morning.

DINA TEMPLE-RASTON, BYLINE: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: OK. Do we know where Snowden is at this minute?

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World
6:49 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Artist's Fake Diploma To Be Sold At Auction

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:55 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. You can spend tens of thousands on a liberal arts degree, or just buy a fake diploma. The artist David Hockney's fake diploma is expected to sell at auction this week for up to $27,000. He created it in 1962 when he was denied a real degree by the Royal College of Art because he refused to write a final essay. And who know? The work of a famous artist might end up worth more in the long run than a real diploma.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Business
6:43 am
Mon June 24, 2013

DuckDuckGo Benefits From Internet Searchers Wanting Privacy

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:55 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The leaks this month by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden revealed just how widespread government surveillance of phone and online information actually is. The revelations of the government's PRISM program have been raising the concerns about privacy, but also have boom to companies that promise greater privacy online.

Emma Jacobs of member station WHYY in Philadelphia has this report.

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Europe
6:11 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Authorities Find Clues To Bridge Disappearance

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene with a story that perfectly fits the headline: only in Russia.

A 23-year-old in the north of that country was looking to find some scrap metal. You know, to make an extra buck. So he stole a small metal bridge which he took home and cut up with a welding torch. Authorities looking for the culprit and the missing pedestrian bridge didn't have to search very hard. He had dragged the bridge with his tractor, leaving a trail all the way to his house.

Business
4:45 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:54 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with another bad day for Chinese stocks.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: The major indexes in China closed down more than five percent - making it the worst day of losses since 2009. And the plunge reverberated, weighing down markets across Asia. The losses we apparently caused by the Chinese government's ongoing attempt to reform its banking system. It's using high interest rates to cut down on risky loans, making access to cash very tight. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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