Morning Edition on RADIO IQ

Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne, Tab O'Neal

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country and that's certainly also true at WVTF and RADIO IQ.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA along with our own Tab O'Neal who provides state and regional news updates, weather and traffic information from our main broadcast center in Roanoke.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Morning Edition airs weekdays from 5:00-9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ with an added hour from 9:00-10:00 on our RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News networks of signals.

Local Host(s): 
Tab O'Neal
Composer ID: 
5187f8cae1c84d4a4b125657|5187f8c5e1c84d4a4b12563e

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Politics
4:54 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Lawmakers Struggle With Wording Of Syria Resolution

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 6:58 am

Congress is trying to fashion language that would restrict U.S. involvement in Syria from escalating. But lawmakers often find it uncomfortable to rein in the commander in chief once U.S. forces have been committed.

Books News & Features
4:54 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Tina Brown: Women Are Terrifyingly Vulnerable In Many Places

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 3:48 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Tina Brown is back now for our regular series Word of Mouth, where she brings us her must-reads. Tina, of course, is the editor-in-chief of "The Daily Beast." She's also the founder of the annual Women in the World Summit. Today, she has three reads on women whose lives were changed by kidnapping and captivity. And just a warning: This conversation does include adult topics and sensitive language. Tina, good morning.

TINA BROWN: Good morning.

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Business
4:54 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Data Marketing Critics Check Out What's Written About Them

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 9:34 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Companies that collect and sell information about you are usually pretty secretive about what they have on you. But one of the biggest data brokers is now letting consumers have a peek.

Yesterday, the Acxiom Corp. set up a website where people can look themselves up. It's called AboutTheData.com. As NPR's Martin Kaste reports, some of the first people to try it were the data industry's critics.

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Around the Nation
3:25 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Forget Twitter. In St. Louis, Bare Your Soul Via Typewriter

Goldkamp also keeps an index card file of choice words to integrate into his poem when he has trouble finding the right words.
Erin Williams STL Public Radio

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 8:10 pm

Typically, 21st century writers fall into two technical categories: Mac or PC. But poet Henry Goldkamp would much rather use a typewriter. He's the sole owner of a mobile poetry business, and for the past three years, he's spent his weekends traveling St. Louis, banging out short poems, on the spot, for anyone who stops by his table.

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Author Interviews
3:25 am
Thu September 5, 2013

'Winter's Bone' Author Revisits A Tragedy In His Ozarks Hometown

Daniel Woodrell's novel Winter's Bone -- a dark family saga set in the Ozarks — was adapted into a film in 2010. Woodrell returned to his hometown of West Plains, Mo., about 20 years ago and has been writing there ever since.
Alexander Klein AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 6:42 pm

The Ozarks mountain town of West Plains, Mo., is the kind of town where a person can stand in his front yard and have a comfortable view of his past.

"My mom was actually born about 150 or 200 feet that way, and my grandfather's house is I guess 200 yards that way," says Daniel Woodrell, author of Winter's Bone, and most recently, The Maid's Version.

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