Morning Edition on RADIO IQ

Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne, Tab O'Neal

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country and that's certainly also true at WVTF and RADIO IQ.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA along with our own Tab O'Neal who provides state and regional news updates, weather and traffic information from our main broadcast center in Roanoke.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Morning Edition airs weekdays from 5:00-9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ with an added hour from 9:00-10:00 on our RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News networks of signals.

Local Host(s): 
Tab O'Neal
Composer ID: 
5187f8cae1c84d4a4b125657|5187f8c5e1c84d4a4b12563e

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Parallels
3:00 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Camus' Stance On Algeria Still Stokes Debate In France

Algeria-born Albert Camus poses for a portrait in Paris following the announcement that he is being awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1957. Camus' views on his birthplace still stoke controversy.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 2:56 pm

A hundred years after his birth, French writer-philosopher Albert Camus is perhaps best-remembered for novels like The Stranger and The Plague, and for his philosophy of absurdism.

But it's another aspect of his intellectual body of work that's under scrutiny as France marks the Camus centennial: his views about his native Algeria.

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Politics
2:59 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Why Obama Shouldn't Worry About His Lousy Poll Numbers

President Obama walks with the chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet, on the South Lawn of the White House on Wednesday.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 11:06 am

President Obama's poll numbers have hit just about the lowest point of his presidency.

They started sinking after the Obamacare website's miserable debut last month. Now, only around 40 percent of Americans think Obama is doing a good job. More than half disapprove of his performance. (A year ago, the numbers were the opposite.)

It seems obvious to say that a high approval rating helps a president, while a low approval rating hurts him. But here are five reasons Obama's numbers might not be as troublesome as they sound.

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Shots - Health News
2:57 am
Thu November 7, 2013

How The Affordable Care Act Pays For Insurance Subsidies

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 3:44 pm

The new health care law will provide around $1 trillion in subsidies to low- and middle-income Americans over the next decade to help them pay for health insurance.

Johanna Humbert of Galien, Mich., was pleasantly surprised to discover that she qualifies for an insurance subsidy, since her current plan is being canceled. Humbert makes about $30,000 a year, so she'll get a subsidy of about $300 a month. The new plan is similar to her current one, but it will cost $250 — about half of what she pays now.

But where will the money come from to pay for subsidies like these?

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Around the Nation
7:12 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Why Are Thousands Of Weddings Planned For Next Tuesday?

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 8:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The new century has offered a bonanza of special dates for weddings. Like one Saturday in 2007, lucky 7/7/7, when 65,000 couples got married. The annual survey for David's Bridal estimates more than 3,000 couples will wed next Tuesday. Yes, it's a Tuesday but it's 11/12/13. Those who miss that sequential date have one last chance for a cool number next year - 12/13/14. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Television
7:08 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Norwegian Broadcaster Lures Viewers With 100 Hours Of Chess

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep, with the Norwegian TV listings. Americans can kill their Sundays watching pro football, but Norway's broadcaster, NRK, plans to program 100 hours of chess. The airtime will focus on a young Norwegian player's quest to become world champion. It will also make a statement about television. The broadcaster says it's pioneering what it calls Slow TV. A previous effort at Slow TV featured 12 hours of non-stop knitting.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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