Morning Edition on RADIO IQ

Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne, Tab O'Neal

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country and that's certainly also true at WVTF and RADIO IQ.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA along with our own Tab O'Neal who provides state and regional news updates, weather and traffic information from our main broadcast center in Roanoke.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Morning Edition airs weekdays from 5:00-9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ with an added hour from 9:00-10:00 on our RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News networks of signals.

Local Host(s): 
Tab O'Neal
Composer ID: 
5187f8cae1c84d4a4b125657|5187f8c5e1c84d4a4b12563e

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StoryCorps
6:54 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Marine Draws Strength From His Marriage To Recover From Burns

Jessica and Anthony Villarreal in December 2011, more than three years after the explosion that severely burned Anthony in Afghanistan.
Courtesy of Jessica Villarreal

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:24 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It is Friday, which is when we hear from StoryCorps, which tells the stories of everyday people, in fact people tell those stories themselves. Marine Corporal Anthony Villarreal served in Afghanistan. In June 2008 his truck was hit by a roadside bomb. He suffered third degree burns, severely disfiguring most of his face and body. His right arm and the fingers on his left hand were amputated. This is a common story, as we know.

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Around the Nation
5:22 am
Fri March 28, 2014

World Vision Reverses Policy That Allowed Hiring Of Gays

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:24 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The Christian charity World Vision announced this week it would begin hiring married gay Christians, but then quickly reversed the decision because of a backlash from evangelicals. NPR's Sam Sanders has more on the controversy.

SAM SANDERS, BYLINE: World Vision is big. It brought in over a billion dollars in revenue last year. Its mission is simple: Raise money to fight poverty, and sponsor lots of children across the globe.

(SOUNDBITE OF WORLD VISION AD)

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NPR Story
4:58 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Landslide Debris Makes Search And Recovery Excruciating Slow

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:24 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's day six of the search and rescue operation at the site of the landslide in Oso, Washington. The death toll stands right now at 26. Ninety people are still reported missing. That's left many families in limbo waiting for news. NPR's Martin Kaste reports on why the recovery work has been so excruciatingly slow.

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NPR Story
4:58 am
Fri March 28, 2014

Russian Troops Mass Near Ukraine's Belgorod Border Region

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 11:24 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here's some news we're tracking today. NATO and Ukrainian officials are warning about a sizable troop build-up by Russia along its border with Ukraine. Western estimates put the military presence on the Russian side at between 20 and 50 thousand troops. Sources told Reuters these include infantry and armored units along with some air support.

Now, why the Russian forces would have gathered is still not clear. Although some Western officials fear they're preparing to invade Ukraine's Russian-speaking east.

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Europe
7:08 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Dolphins In Crimea Join Russian Navy

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 12:18 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Russia took over many Ukrainian military assets when it annexed Crimea, including dolphins at the oceanarium in Sebastopol. Trained to locate enemy divers and carry spy equipment, Ukraine planned to shut down the combat dolphin program in April - too expensive. Now these dolphins will raise their fins to the Kremlin, which apparently does have the rubles to upgrade their gear. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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