Morning Edition on RADIO IQ with BBC

Steve Inskeep; Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country and that's certainly also true at WVTF and RADIO IQ.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA along with our own Tab O'Neal who provides state and regional news updates, weather and traffic information from our main broadcast center in Roanoke.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Morning Edition airs weekdays from 5:00-9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ with an added hour from 9:00-10:00 on our RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News networks of signals.

Local Host(s): 
Tab O'Neal
Composer ID: 
5187f8dae1c8221ab9bfee3b|5187f8c5e1c84d4a4b12563e

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Sports
8:23 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Can Chicago's Bulls Beat Defending Champion Miami Heat?

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 11:43 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

We are getting deeper into the NBA playoffs and the question of the moment: Can the Chicago Bulls really beat the defending champion Miami Heat? The Bulls showed they can do it at least in one game. They won the opener Monday in their second-round series. It was really a stunning result, considering that Chicago is missing several of its best players because of injury and illness.

Tonight, Game 2 in Miami, and NPR's Tom Goldman joins me for some playoff chatter. And, Tom, can I thank you for something?

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Around the Nation
7:16 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Workers Wreak Havoc During Home Remodeling Job In Oregon

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 11:43 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Home remodeling is hard and nobody knows that better than workers near Florence, Oregon. Three men arrived on the job. KCST radio reports the first man started a fire in the carport to get warm.

Around the Nation
6:50 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Texas Woman Says Bacon Is Key To Long Life

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 11:43 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Pearl Cantrell is 105. Naturally, her local TV station, KRBC in Texas, did a feature asking her the secret to longevity. Her answer: Bacon. I eat it every day, she said. Well, this caught the attention of Oscar Meyer.

(SOUNDBITE OF "OSCAR MEYER WEINER SONG")

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: (singing) Oh, I'd love to be an Oscar Meyer Weiner...

Around the Nation
6:08 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Specially Trained FBI Agents Will Help Kidnapped Women Heal

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 11:43 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

When Charles Ramsey talked with a 911 operator about the woman he'd found, the operator had this question.

(SOUNDBITE OF 911 CALL)

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: Can you ask her if she needs an ambulance?

CHARLES RAMSEY: You need an ambulance or what? She needs everything. She's in a panic. I bet she's been kidnapped, so you know, put yourself in her shoes.

INSKEEP: Put yourself in her shoes.

NPR's Carrie Johnson reports law enforcement is trying to do just that.

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It's All Politics
4:40 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Congress Considers Patch To Keep Helium Supply Afloat

Deward Cawthon, a plant operator at the Federal Helium Reserve, walks through the Federal Crude Helium Enrichment Unit near Amarillo, Texas, in 2011.
Joyce Marshall MCT/Landov

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 2:39 pm

The Senate is considering legislation to prevent a global helium shortage from worsening in October. That's when one huge supply of helium in the U.S. is set to terminate. The House overwhelmingly passed its own bill last month to keep the Federal Helium Program going.

That was a relief to industries that can't get along without helium. The gas is used in MRI machines, semiconductors, aerospace equipment, lasers and of course balloons.

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