Morning Edition on RADIO IQ with BBC

Steve Inskeep; Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country and that's certainly also true at WVTF and RADIO IQ.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA along with our own Tab O'Neal who provides state and regional news updates, weather and traffic information from our main broadcast center in Roanoke.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Morning Edition airs weekdays from 5:00-9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ with an added hour from 9:00-10:00 on our RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News networks of signals.

Local Host(s): 
Tab O'Neal
Composer ID: 
5187f8dae1c8221ab9bfee3b|5187f8c5e1c84d4a4b12563e

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Research News
3:15 am
Tue July 30, 2013

For Some Mammals It's One Love, But Reasons Still Unclear

Golden lion tamarins are one species that are largely monogamous.
Felipe Dana AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 11:11 am

Fewer than 10 percent of all mammal species are monogamous. In fact, biologists have long disagreed over why monogamy exists at all. That's the subject of two studies published this week — and they come to different conclusions.

Animals that leave the most offspring win the race to spread their genes and to perpetuate their lineage. So for most mammals, males have a simple strategy: Mate with as many females as possible.

"Monogamy is a problem," says Dieter Lukas, a biologist at Cambridge University. "Why should a male keep to one female?"

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Animals
5:31 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Putin Puckers Up For 46-Pound Pike In Video

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 7:07 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Russian President Vladimir Putin is known for getting out and experiencing the great outdoors. All of his pursuits are meticulously documented by the media. He's ridden horseback shirtless, tranquilized a tiger, plunged into a lake in a submarine, and led migrating birds in a motorized glider.

Animals
5:27 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Texas' Two-Headed Turtle Is Facebook Friendly

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 7:07 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

In Texas, ThelmaandLouise is a big draw - not the movie. ThelmaandLouise, one word, is the name of a two-headed turtle born at the San Antonio Zoo last month. The Texas cooter is so popular, she has her own Facebook page and more than 1,700 friends. Her page says she - or they - is interested in meeting Maryland Terrapins and sea turtles. Double dating?

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
4:27 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Encore: 'Fosters' Puts A Twist On The Old Family Drama

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 7:07 am

A new show on ABC Family follows a family with one biological kid, two adopted kids and a new addition, a teenage foster kid. Given how fostering is such an inherently dramatic situation, why hasn't this ever been the premise of a TV show before? (This story originally aired on All Things Considered on June 3, 2013.)

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NPR Story
4:27 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Mali Holds First Vote Following Unrest

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 7:07 am

Linda Wertheimer talks with Rukmini Callimachi, West Africa bureau chief for The Associated Press, about Sunday's elections in Mali, the first democratic vote there since French troops pushed Islamist militants out of the north of that country.

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