Morning Edition on RADIO IQ with BBC

Steve Inskeep; Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country and that's certainly also true at WVTF and RADIO IQ.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA along with our own Tab O'Neal who provides state and regional news updates, weather and traffic information from our main broadcast center in Roanoke.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Morning Edition airs weekdays from 5:00-9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ with an added hour from 9:00-10:00 on our RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News networks of signals.

Local Host(s): 
Tab O'Neal
Composer ID: 
5187f8dae1c8221ab9bfee3b|5187f8c5e1c84d4a4b12563e

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Around the Nation
4:50 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Harvest Brings Farm Families Together, Redefines Commitment

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 5:36 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, here's a reality about farming. From the earliest days of this country, it's been an uncertain business, and for many decades, national policies have been designed to smooth out that risk. But, of course, the risk never entirely goes away. You can never control the rain, for example, and lately the uncertainty has been growing. Corn prices are down. The farm bill is stalled in Congress and there's a sense that good times may be fading.

From Nebraska, Grant Gerlock of NET News brings us his report.

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Politics
4:50 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Government Shutdown Delays Start Of Crab Season

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 5:27 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Crabbing season starts today in Alaska, well, except it doesn't. Crabbers and their boats are stuck in port because they can't get the permits that they need to begin their work. Federal workers who issue those permits are off the job because of the partial government shutdown and this is cutting into the short three month Alaska crab season, which is worth upwards of $200 million for the crabbers alone.

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Around the Nation
2:51 am
Tue October 15, 2013

One Roof, Many Generations: Redefining The Single-Family Home

Three generations live under this roof: (from left) 19-year-old Jamie Dusseault, grandmother Jacque Ruggles, mother Marci Dusseault and 22-year-old Chelsie Dusseault.
Peter O'Dowd KJZZ

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 10:12 am

New homes are back in a big way — literally. This summer, a typical new house in Phoenix was more than 20 percent larger than a resale home as builders across the country added more space to accommodate post-recession lifestyles.

Take Jacque Ruggles' family, for example. Four women from three generations live under one roof.

"I'm the matriarch," Ruggles says. "I'm grandma."

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Education
2:49 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Silicon Valley Trailer Park Residents Fight To Stay

Palo Alto middle school student Jennifer Munoz Tello (right) stands outside her family's trailer in Palo Alto with her mother, Sandra, and 2-year-old sister, Cynthia.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 11:37 am

Sunny Palo Alto, Calif., is awash in multimillion-dollar homes, luxury Tesla electric cars and other financial fruits from a digital revolution the city helped spark. The Silicon Valley city is home to Stanford University, at least eight billionaires, and one mobile home park.

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Law
2:48 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Supreme Court Returns To Affirmative Action In Michigan Case

People wait in line for the beginning of the Supreme Court's new term on Oct. 7.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 10:12 am

The U.S. Supreme Court takes up the issue of affirmative action again Tuesday, but this time the question is not whether race may be considered as a factor in college admissions. Instead, this case tests whether voters can ban affirmative action programs through a referendum.

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