Morning Edition on RADIO IQ with BBC

Steve Inskeep; Renee Montagne

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country and that's certainly also true at WVTF and RADIO IQ.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA along with our own Tab O'Neal who provides state and regional news updates, weather and traffic information from our main broadcast center in Roanoke.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Morning Edition airs weekdays from 5:00-9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ with an added hour from 9:00-10:00 on our RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News networks of signals.

Local Host(s): 
Tab O'Neal
Composer ID: 
5187f8dae1c8221ab9bfee3b|5187f8c5e1c84d4a4b12563e

Pages

All Tech Considered
5:25 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Key To Unlocking Your Phone? Give It The Finger(print)

Phil Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing, speaks about fingerprint security features of the new iPhone 5s Tuesday in Cupertino, Calif.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 7:54 am

The first note I sent out after Apple announced it was including a fingerprint scanner in the new iPhone 5s was to Charlie Miller.

Read more
Around the Nation
6:31 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Masked Crusaders Save Cat From Burning House

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 7:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. John Buckland and Troy Marcum of Milton, West Virginia were superheroes when they rescued a cat from a burning home. WCHS-TV reports the two men were mentoring children at an American Legion Post wearing Batman and Captain America costumes when they saw smoke at a nearby house. The masked crusaders rushed over and after the cat was resuscitated by Batman, it took one look and hissed. You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:24 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Cubs Fan Continues Wait For World Series Win

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 7:08 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

This next news story has been a tradition since roughly 1908. It's the story of a Chicago Cubs fan waiting to win the World Series. The News-Sun says Doris Davis has been a fan since 1926. In the days before TV, she listened on the radio while moving players around a diamond she made from a checkerboard. And she's still waiting for that championship. As the season nears its end, the Cubs are 22 games out of first.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Politics
5:32 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Tea Party Won't Let Congress Forget Obamacare Issues

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 7:08 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Congress did not expect to spend September debating Syria. Many Republicans, instead, were planning battles over the budget and over the healthcare law that's about to take affect. Tea Party activists are going ahead with meetings on their issues. One event comes in Washington D.C. today. NPR's Don Gonyea has been talking with activists.

Read more
Middle East
5:11 am
Tue September 10, 2013

2 Democratic Senators Propose Alternate Plan For Syria

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 7:08 am

President Obama on Tuesday meets with Democratic senators to press his case for military action against Syria. Two moderate senators are offering an alternative plan. It would delay military action for 45 days, and give Bashar Assad another chance to get rid of his chemical weapons. Steve Inskeep talks to Sen. Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota about the plan.

Pages