Marketplace on WVTF, RADIO IQ & RADIO IQ w/BBC News

Weekdays at 6:00 PM on WVTF and 6:30 PM on RADIO IQ

Marketplace with host Kai Ryssdal produced and distributed by American Public Media focuses on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets.

The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance. 

Marketplace, weekdays at 6:00 pm on WVTF and 6:30 pm on our RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News networks.

Be sure to check out the  Marketplace Morning Report weekdays at 9:51 on RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News.

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Program Headlines

  • Thursday, June 30, 2016 3:20pm

    Update: Misty Copeland was promoted Tuesday, June 30 to principal dancer for the American Ballet Theater. She's the first-ever African-American woman to hold that title.

     


    Age starting dance: 13

    Height: 5 feet 2 inches

    Bust: "Bigger than most"

    At least, that's how ballerina Misty Copeland describes her numbers-defying career in dance. A soloist with the American Ballet Theater in New York, Copeland recently explained how she doesn't really fit into the traditional model for ballet, but still made it work.

    “All of those numbers, they just don’t add up to create a classical dancer,” she says. "No matter what, I'm going to be who I am."

    Listen to the full conversation from our live show in New York City in the audio player above.

  • Tuesday, June 30, 2015 2:40pm

    The need-to-know numbers about the Greek debt crisis, explained by Paddy Hirsch.

    Produced by Preditorial | www.preditorial.tv

    Writer and Host: Paddy Hirsch

    Director and Edtor: Rick Kent

    Director of Photography: Anton Seim

    Producer: Mimi Kent

  • Tuesday, June 30, 2015 7:00am

    A new move from President Barack Obama aims to make more Americans eligible for overtime pay. The proposal, announced Tuesday, could mean bigger paychecks for up to five million workers.

    Employees with a salary of $23,660 a year or more can be considered management and barred from time-and-a-half pay, even if they work more than 40 hours. The proposed change from the Obama administration would raise the bar to $50,440. And it'll move in the future to keep pace with inflation and wage growth.

    Dan Hamermesh, Professor Emeritus of economics at University of Texas at Austin, doesn’t think the overall effects will be very large. Many workers will get small wins: either get a slight bump in take home pay or have slightly shorter hours for the same salary.

    “It will also, I’m pretty sure, create jobs,” he adds. “If an extra hour becomes more expensive, some employers are gonna wanna hire more people.”

    This is all likely to raise costs for companies, which is why business advocates aren’t happy.

    A change like this does not require approval from Congress, but it’s not a done deal yet. It’ll be open for public comment and could take several months to finalize.

    Mark Garrison: Right now, employees with a salary just under $24-thousand dollars can be considered management and barred from time and a half pay. The rule change from the Obama administration would raise the bar to a little over 50-grand. And it'll move in the future to keep pace with inflation.

    Dan Hamermesh: I don’t think this is a huge thing. I think it’s beneficial. I don’t think the effects will be very large.

    University of Texas economics professor Dan Hamermesh says many workers will either get a small bump in take home pay or have slightly shorter hours for the same salary.

    Dan Hamermesh: It will also, I’m pretty sure, create jobs, because if an extra hour becomes more expensive, some employers are gonna wanna hire more people.

    This is all likely to raise costs for companies, which is why business advocates aren’t happy. A change like this does not require approval from Congress, but it’s not a done deal yet. It’ll be open for public comment and could take several months to finalize. In New York, I'm Mark Garrison, for Marketplace.

  • Tuesday, June 30, 2015 7:00am

    Greece and the faulty assumption that everyone has access to a credit card. We'll check in on how Greek citizens are handling the banks being shutdown there. Plus, the Export-Import Bank’s charter expires at midnight Wednesday: we look at how this leaves it in an awkward state of limbo. And Apple's new music streaming service launches today. We'll talk about what to expect.

     

     

  • Tuesday, June 30, 2015 6:00am

    The controversial Export-Import Bank’s authorization will expire at the stroke of midnight Wednesday, meaning the government institution that finances exports made by American companies, among other things, can follow through on its existing loans and guarantees, but can’t fund new ones.

    The bank has long been targeted by some Republicans who don’t believe the government should be involved in this market and that the bank only benefits large corporations.

    Representative Jim Jordan, a Republican from Ohio, says the bank amounts to corporate welfare and sees opportunity in Wednesday’s expiration.

    “It’s one thing to reauthorize it,” he says, noting the bank has been reauthorized numerous times during its eight-decade existence. “It’s another thing to restart it once it’s already expired.”

    Supporters of the Ex-Im Bank, meanwhile, argue it fills a gap in the private lending market for companies of all sizes and that the uncertainty leading up to Wednesday’s expiration has already hurt American businesses.

    "Symbolically, [the expiration] is hugely important," says Edward Alden, a senior fellow with the Council on Foreign Relations. "I do think contracts will be lost, though it's hard to put a clear number on it."

    “The winner here is China and other countries that are going full steam ahead with their own export credit agencies and taking advantage of the opportunity to see Ex-Im lapse,” says Miriam Sapiro, principal at the consulting firm Summit Strategies and a former deputy U.S. trade representative.

    Sapiro’s hoping Congress will reauthorize the bank when it’s back in session in July.