Marketplace on RADIO IQ

Weekdays at 6:30 p.m. on RADIO IQ
Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with host Kai Ryssdal produced and distributed by American Public Media focuses on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets.

The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance. 

Marketplace, weekdays at 6:00 pm on WVTF and 6:30 pm on our RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News networks.

Be sure to check out the  Marketplace Morning Report weekdays at 9:51 on RADIO IQ andRADIO IQ With BBC News.

Composer ID: 
5187f8c9e1c84d4a4b12564c|5187f8c5e1c84d4a4b12563e

Program Headlines

  • Wednesday, April 23, 2014 6:00pm

    It's an impressive list of high quality television: The Sopranos, Six Feet Under, The Wire, Big Love, Deadwood, Eastbound & Down, Family Tree, Enlightened, Treme, early seasons of Boardwalk Empire and True Blood, plus mini-series like Band of BrothersJohn Adams. 

    These are all of the HBO shows that will be made available next month to Amazon Prime customers.

    To some, it will feel like a necessary perk, what with Amazon Prime membership costing more than it used to. To others, it's a farewell to productivity, because let's face it, this is a lot of television to watch. Just how long will it take you to get through all of this content?

    Assuming you take no potty breaks, don't sleep, and eat in front of your laptop or television, it will take this long:

    Thanks to the website tiii.me, which allows you to calculate how much of your life you've spent watching tv based on what shows you've seen, it will take a grand total of 21 days, 23 hours, and 30 minutes to blaze your way through all of the HBO content.

    If you're an Amazon Prime member, maybe don't plan on doing much for the month of May.

  • Wednesday, April 23, 2014 5:23pm

    Valeant, a pharmaceutical company, is trying to look good. It’s made an offer for Allergan, the company that produces Botox. Over the past couple of years, Valeant has bought up other pharma companies including Solta, Obaji and Medicis, makers of skin-smothing-lasers, creams and fillers. Valeant isn't looking to make more by increasing R&D, but you don’t have to wrinkle up your forehead to figure out why it wants to buy the company that produces Botox.

    “They are clearly going to have a monopoly in the marketplace," says Dr. Jack Berdy,  CEO of SmoothMed, a service that provides botox treatments in Manhattan. Berdy notes Valeant already bought the company that makes Dysport – a Botox competitor.

    “I can’t imagine the company Valeant, who would look for economics in a takeover, maintaining both products in the marketplace," he said. "One of them would probably disappear.”

    Along with a lot of jobs -- for some people, Valeant's offer is going to create stress (and wrinkles). Seamus Fernandez, an analyst with Leerink Partners, agrees.  “That’s a fair conclusion,” he says.

    Fernandez says the international market for cosmetic dermatology is worth billions every year. And with the potential for consolidating workforces, Valeant is trying to be efficient.

    “Most doctors are pretty busy, they would much prefer to just talk to one person who could go through and update them on what’s new on all the products they use, rather than having to have a bunch of different sales people come in from each company,” says David Krempa, an equity analyst with Morningstar.

    Fernandez says, unlike the wrinkles it fixes, the market for cosmetic dermatology is growing – at about 12 percent a year.

  • Wednesday, April 23, 2014 5:16pm

    About one James Edward Franco:

    An actor, yes. But also: A poet! A novelist! A filmmaker! And an artist.

    Not so fast, says Roberta Smith, co-chief art critic for The New York Times. Some of Franco's photographs are on display at a gallery in New York, and Smith isn't impressed.

    Franco "remains embarrassingly clueless when it comes to art," she writes in her review"The deep content here, beneath the entitled narcissism, is a confused desperation that seems to drive Mr. Franco's pursuit of visual art."

    She continues: "It's hard not to feel some sympathy for him, while also wishing that someone or something would make him stop."

    Ouch.

  • Wednesday, April 23, 2014 5:12pm

    More than 1,000 IRS workers who failed to pay their taxes still received performance bonuses.

    In all, 28,000 tax workers with substantiated conduct issues collected $2.8 million in bonuses for 2011 and 2012.

    Andrew Biggs with the American Enterprise Institute generally favors performance bonuses for federal employees. But, Biggs says, “it is difficult to have employees working for the IRS who didn’t in fact pay their own taxes. That undermines the credibility of the agency as a whole.”

    The IRS is considering a policy change.

    But in order to make conduct issues affect performance bonuses, the IRS must negotiate a new agreement with the National Treasury Employees Union.

  • Wednesday, April 23, 2014 5:06pm

    The New York Police Department got a big lesson in social media this week. It created a Twitter hashtag – #myNYPD – to get people to tweet pictures of happy New Yorkers standing with smiling officers. But this being both New York, and social media, the NYPD didn’t get quite what it expected.

    Not only did it backfire – now the hashtag has spread on Twitter to other police departments like Los Angeles and Chicago.

    Twitter users sent in scores of pictures of New Yorkers who appear to be abused, beaten, even run over by officers. Some of the photos may be old or misleading, but the NYPD fell into a trap that has sunk many a social media campaign before it. 

    “Part of me is kind of incredulous. Didn’t they expect they would get this kind of backlash?” says Ann Handley, head of content at MarketingProfs, and co-author of Content Rules. “You can’t get people to talk about how great you are on Twitter.”  

    The NYPD could have learned something from McDonald’s' experience two years ago. It wanted people to send in nice comments with the hashtag “#McDstories.” They got something else entirely, says Howard Fencl, Vice President at the crisis communications firm Hennes Paynter Communications. “Trolls came out of the woodwork with ‘my brother found fake fingernail in his french fries, #McDstories,” he says. "People are sick of spin.” 

    Some companies have more success jumping into what everyone is already talking about on Twitter. After Colorado legalized marijuana, Ben & Jerry’s tweeted a picture of empty ice cream shelves, which went down well with Twitter users. 

    But if you’re big and important, the public might just be itching to knock you down a peg.

    “The Police Department. McDonald's. You talk about taking it to the man, not every organization is ‘The Man’,” says Jay Baer, founder of the social media consultancy, Convince & Convert.

    Baer says social media doesn’t create hate; it just uncovers it. 

Playlist

September 20, 2013

6:32 PM
Fievre
Artist : Oddisee
Album : The Beauty In All
Composer :
Label : Mello Music Group