Here and Now

Weekdays at 1:00pm on RADIO IQ

Catch up with the day's top stories during this energetic hour of news and conversation. Here and Now  is an essential midday news magazine for those who want the latest news and expanded conversation on today's hot-button topics: public affairs, foreign policy, science and technology, the arts and more. The show's guest roster has included Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Halberstam, director John Malkovich, the "Wall Street Journal's" John Harwood and actress Jane Fonda. The show is produced by WBUR/Boston.

The Washington Post reports this week that a federal program offering loan forgiveness for students working in the public or non-profit sectors may be on the chopping block in the soon-to-be-released Trump administration budget.

As the future of U.S. participation in the Paris Climate Accords awaits a decision from President Trump, we revisit a conversation with one family from Switzerland that’s sailing, hiking and cycling around the world to call attention to the effects of climate change.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd met the Schwörer family on its 50-foot aluminum sloop during a stop in Boston last November.

In the next month, New York state lawmakers are expected to vote on a bill that allows police to check a driver’s cellphone with a “textalyzer,” which can tell whether a driver swiped or tapped the phone in the run-up to a crash.

The global cyberattack known as WannaCry is on the wane Tuesday, having held data hostage on hundreds of thousands of computers in more than 100 countries since Friday.

Cybersecurity experts and intelligence agencies say the attack bears similarities to past attacks carried out by North Korea. Meanwhile, SpaceX launched one of its heaviest payloads yet: a 6-ton satellite from the British company Inmarsat.

As the nation’s opioid addiction and overdose crisis grows, the Cherokee Nation is launching the first-ever lawsuit against drug distributors that will be litigated in a tribal court.

The suit takes on companies including pharmacies CVS Health, Walgreens and Wal-Mart, and drug distributors Cardinal Health, Inc. and McKesson Corporation, alleging that they didn’t properly monitor prescription painkillers, which eventually “flooded” every Cherokee county.

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