Here and Now

Weekdays at 1:00pm on RADIO IQ

Catch up with the day's top stories during this energetic hour of news and conversation. Here and Now  is an essential midday news magazine for those who want the latest news and expanded conversation on today's hot-button topics: public affairs, foreign policy, science and technology, the arts and more. The show's guest roster has included Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Halberstam, director John Malkovich, the "Wall Street Journal's" John Harwood and actress Jane Fonda. The show is produced by WBUR/Boston.

As presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump get ready for their first debate Monday night, Here & Now looks at some of the highlights in the history of presidential debates.

The first Clinton-Trump debate falls on the anniversary of the first-ever televised presidential debate, between Republican Richard Nixon and Democrat John F. Kennedy, on Sept. 26, 1960.

There’s just over a week left in Major League Baseball’s regular season. But only one team — the Chicago Cubs — has clinched a playoff berth.

That means the race for the postseason, both division winners and wild card hopefuls, is reaching a crescendo.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca about how the end of the season is shaping up.

A sculpture with a secret message at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia, has stumped amateur code breakers for a quarter-century.

Elonka Dunin, a software developer from Nashville, Tennessee, has spent the better part of two decades trying to unravel the mystery of Kryptos.

Tony Youngblood from Here & Now contributor Nashville Public Radio has her story.

The Washington Post reported Tuesday that Donald Trump spent more than $250,000 from his charitable foundation to settle lawsuits involving his businesses.

How One Syrian Family Found A Home In Texas

Sep 21, 2016

Bassam Al Abbas does not like to think about the civil war raging in his home country of Syria.

The conflict, which produced nearly 5 million refugees and internally displaced millions more, also drove him and his family from their homes in 2012. For years they navigated foreign languages and vetting systems before eventually settling in Austin, Texas, in May.

“I cannot describe how much they welcomed me,” Al Abbas told Here & Now. “They made us love this country.”

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