Here and Now

Weekdays at 1:00pm on RADIO IQ

Catch up with the day's top stories during this energetic hour of news and conversation. Here and Now  is an essential midday news magazine for those who want the latest news and expanded conversation on today's hot-button topics: public affairs, foreign policy, science and technology, the arts and more. The show's guest roster has included Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Halberstam, director John Malkovich, the "Wall Street Journal's" John Harwood and actress Jane Fonda. The show is produced by WBUR/Boston.

The day after Donald Trump is sworn in as president, tens of thousands of protesters are expected to attend the Women’s March on Washington on Saturday. Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Vanessa Wruble, who has been involved in organizing the march as its head of campaign operations. Wruble is also co-founder and co-president of OkayAfrica.

Federal, state and local officials in Washington, D.C. are preparing for large crowds and many protests at Donald Trump's inauguration Friday, and other inaugural events and demonstrations this week.

Patrick Madden (@Patrick_Madden) of Here & Now contributor WAMU reports on the event’s many security challenges, and what officials are doing to prepare.

President-elect Donald Trump’s pick for Secretary of Health and Human Services, Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.), is taking the hot seat Wednesday, facing questions from lawmakers on the Senate Health Committee.

The discussion will likely include Price’s views on the Affordable Care Act, as well as how he would plan to reshape the nation’s health care system.

In the new book “A Consequential President: The Legacy of Barack Obama,” Michael D’Antonio looks at Barack Obama’s presidency through the promises he made when he was campaigning for office.

When he was assassinated in 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. left behind a legacy of inspiring words in the many sermons and speeches he delivered during his push for civil rights. On this Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Here & Now listens back to his words that still resonate today.

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