Here and Now

Weekdays at 1:00pm on RADIO IQ

Catch up with the day's top stories during this energetic hour of news and conversation. Here and Now  is an essential midday news magazine for those who want the latest news and expanded conversation on today's hot-button topics: public affairs, foreign policy, science and technology, the arts and more. The show's guest roster has included Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Halberstam, director John Malkovich, the "Wall Street Journal's" John Harwood and actress Jane Fonda. The show is produced by WBUR/Boston.

How Animals Use Physics To Survive

21 hours ago

How does a gecko manage to walk on the ceiling? Do cats drink like we do? And what happens when a dog shakes water off its coat? A new book explores how animals use physics in their daily lives.

Washington College anthropology professor Bill Schindler (@drbillschindler) wants his students to experience what life was like in prehistoric times. So he tasks the students with making their own tools, butchering their own meat and gathering nuts for sustenance.

And he’s lived the life himself. Last year, Schindler took part in the National Geographic show “The Great Human Race.”

Most restaurants pack their plates with portions that are often two or three times the recommended serving size. And because people don’t always know how many calories they’re consuming when they dine out, they often eat all that food.

President Obama called the Chesapeake Bay a “national treasure.” In a 2009 executive order, he helped launch a massive cleanup effort orchestrated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Now that restoration, and others like it around the country, are in limbo because President Trump’s budget blueprint would eliminate funding for the Chesapeake and other regional cleanup programs.

According to a recent Gallup poll, daily worry has increased among Americans since the presidential election. There was also an increase in worry after President Obama’s 2008 election, though not as much. Times of change and uncertainty often cause people to worry more.

Pages