All Things Considered on WVTF, RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ w/BBC News

Weekdays from 4:00 pm to 6:30 pm on WVTF/RADIO IQ.

Much has changed on All Things Considered since the program debuted on May 3, 1971. But there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block, with Beverly Amsler hosting on WVTF and RADIO IQ.  In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays.

All Things Considered airs Monday - Friday from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm on WVTF and 4:00 pm to 6:30 pm on RADIO IQ

On the weekends, ATC is on 5:00-6:00 pm on WVTF and 6:00-7:00 PM on RADIO IQ and our RADIO IQ With BBC News service.

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National Security
4:38 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

'Times' Report Finds No al-Qaida Involvement In Benghazi Attack

Originally published on Mon December 30, 2013 5:58 pm

In a 7,000-word investigative report published by The New York Times on Sunday, David Kirkpatrick revisits last year's assault on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya. Kirkpatrick finds that — contrary to much commentary from mostly Republican members of Congress — al-Qaida was not involved. He joins Robert Siegel to talk about his reporting and the backlash against his conclusions.

Remembrances
5:42 pm
Sun December 29, 2013

Remembering Eydie Gorme, A Vegas Singer Without The Drama

Steve Lawrence (left), Edyie Gorme (center) and Jerry Lewis sing during the MDA Telethon at the Sahara Hotel in 1993.
AP

Originally published on Tue December 31, 2013 12:52 pm

Before turning the page on 2013, All Things Considered wanted to tell you stories you haven't heard — unknown stories about people you've heard of, and unknown people who have affected your lives in ways you can't imagine.

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Remembrances
5:13 pm
Sun December 29, 2013

The FBI Investigator Who Coined The Term 'Serial Killer'

FBI investigator Robert Ressler pioneered the practice of criminal profiling and is credited with coining the term "serial killer." He died on May 5.
Paul Harris Getty Images

Originally published on Sun December 29, 2013 6:41 pm

Before turning the page on 2013, All Things Considered wanted to tell you stories you haven't heard — unknown stories about people you've heard of, and unknown people who have affected your lives in ways you can't imagine.

If you've heard the phrase "serial killer," then you're familiar with the work of Robert Ressler.

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NPR Story
5:00 pm
Sun December 29, 2013

Fracking Pioneer Helped Boost U.S. Energy Independence

Originally published on Sun December 29, 2013 5:42 pm

George Mitchell, the "father of hydraulic fracturing," passed away earlier this year. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Wall Street Journal reporter Russell Gold about Mitchell's invention and his somewhat progressive environmental views.

Remembrances
5:00 pm
Sun December 29, 2013

Bum Phillips: Famous Football Name, Underappreciated Figure

Originally published on Sun December 29, 2013 5:42 pm

Former NFL coach Bum Phillips died in October. With his unmistakable cowboy hat and colorful wit, he led the Houston Oilers to two conference championship games, missing the Super Bowl only due to the dominance of the Pittsburgh Steelers at the time. We here from longtime Houston sports writer John McClain.

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