All Things Considered on WVTF, RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ w/BBC News

Weekdays from 4:00 pm to 6:30 pm on WVTF/RADIO IQ.

Much has changed on All Things Considered since the program debuted on May 3, 1971. But there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block, with Beverly Amsler hosting on WVTF and RADIO IQ.  In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays.

All Things Considered airs Monday - Friday from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm on WVTF and 4:00 pm to 6:30 pm on RADIO IQ

On the weekends, ATC is on 5:00-6:00 pm on WVTF and 6:00-7:00 PM on RADIO IQ and our RADIO IQ With BBC News service.

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Code Switch
8:00 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

For Abused Native American Women, New Law Provides A 'Ray Of Hope'

Deborah Parker, vice chair of the Tulalip Tribes of Washington state, reacts to President Barack Obama signing the Violence Against Women Act in 2013 in Washington.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 8:07 pm

This Thursday, three Native American tribes are changing how they administer justice.

For almost four decades, a U.S. Supreme Court ruling has barred tribes from prosecuting non-American Indian defendants. But as part of last year's re-authorization of the Violence Against Women Act, a new program now allows tribes to try some non-Indian defendants in domestic abuse cases.

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All Tech Considered
6:46 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Video Streaming Is Straining, But Who Will Ease The Tension?

Internet service providers are having trouble keeping pace with growing demand for video streaming services. But there's disagreement over how to fix the problem.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 2:16 pm

Suzie Felber's kids are only just learning what a commercial is.

"They start screaming when they come on," she says. "They think the TV's broken."

The Felbers usually stream television shows over the Internet in their New Jersey home.

More and more people are following suit, using services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime. But these programs take up a huge amount of digital bandwidth, and that's led to a dispute between these services and the Internet service providers that carry them.

Slower Service

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Law
4:23 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

New York Backs Off Controversial Punishment For Juveniles

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 8:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The state of New York is taking a step toward a more humane prison system. Prison officials reached a landmark agreement today to limit the use of solitary confinement. The deal prohibits the use of extreme isolation to discipline under-age prisoners. It also offers new protections for pregnant women and for the disabled.

With us to talk about the deal is NPR's Carrie Johnson. Hi.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: Hi, Robert.

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From Our Listeners
4:23 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Letters: Winter Sports, Both Real And Fictive

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 8:02 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's time now for your letters and two corrections.

Earlier this week, in a story about the Olympic sport of curling, we said curlers sweep the ice to give their team's stone more momentum. Well, that's not quite right, as many listeners pointed out. In fact, sweeping the ice melts it slightly. And that reduces the friction against the curling stone, allowing it to go farther.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Sports
4:23 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Hometown Hero Triumphs In Women's Figure Skating

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 8:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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