All Things Considered on RADIO IQ with BBC

Weekdays from 6:00 pm to 6:30 pm on RADIO IQ with BBC.
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish.

Much has changed on All Things Considered since the program debuted on May 3, 1971. But there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block, with Beverly Amsler hosting on WVTF and RADIO IQ.  In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays.

All Things Considered airs Monday - Friday from 6:00 pm to 6:30 pm on RADIO IQ With BBC News

On the weekends, ATC is on 5:00-6:00 pm on WVTF and 6:00-7:00 PM on RADIO IQ and our RADIO IQ With BBC News service.

Local Host(s): 
Beverly Amsler
Composer ID: 
5187f8dce1c8221ab9bfee4c|5187f8c5e1c84d4a4b12563e

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Deceptive Cadence
5:00 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

Honey, Blood And Harmony: Jordi Savall's Balkan Journey

Early music specialist Jordi Savall has turned his attention to the widely varied music of the Balkans. "For me," he says, "it's one of the most exciting projects that happened in the last 20 years."
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 1:42 pm

Jordi Savall has made a career of reviving ancient music. Whatever the age of the songs, though, he doesn't play them as museum-piece recreations, preserved in isolation. Savall takes great pleasure in smashing together music from different times and different cultures.

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National Security
5:49 pm
Sat April 19, 2014

Training For An Uncertain Military Future In The Calif. Desert

Soldiers assigned to the 120th Combined Arms Battalion, 30th Heavy Brigade Combat Team, participate in desert training at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., in 2009.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 6:28 pm

In the middle of the Mojave Desert, between Los Angeles and Las Vegas, there is a place that looks just like Afghanistan.

There are villages with houses, shops, a mosque and a marketplace. But it is all a facade. The area is actually a U.S. Army installation, the Fort Irwin National Training Center. If you want to see how a decade of fighting has profoundly changed the way the U.S. prepares its soldiers for war, this is where you come.

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Asia
5:39 pm
Sat April 19, 2014

The Players In The Battle For India's Soul

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 6:28 pm

The numbers from India's election are staggering: 814 million potential voters, nine stages of voting over six weeks. They are the biggest in the world. Correspondent Julie McCarthy talks with NPR's Arun Rath about the candidates vying for power.

World
5:39 pm
Sat April 19, 2014

Russia's Military: Threatening Enough To Avoid Using Force?

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 6:28 pm

Russia is in the middle of a planned upgrade and expansion of its military forces, but global affairs professor Mark Galeotti tells NPR's Arun Rath that Russia's military has its limits.

Parallels
7:13 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

A Journey Of Pain And Beauty: On Becoming Transgender In India

Abhina Aher was born a boy biologically and is now a hijra, a member of an ancient transgender community in India. Of her painful physical and psychological transformation, Aher remembers now: "I just wanted to become a beautiful butterfly."
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 9:25 am

The signs came early that Abhina Aher was different.

Born a boy biologically and given the male name Abhijit, Aher grew up in a middle-class neighborhood of Mumbai, India. The son of a single mother who nurtured a love of dance, Aher would watch enthralled as she performed.

"I used to love to wear the clothes that my mother used to wear — her jewelry, her makeup," Aher, now 37, recalls. "That is something which used to extremely fascinate me."

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