All Things Considered on RADIO IQ with BBC

Weekdays from 6:00 pm to 6:30 pm on RADIO IQ with BBC.
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish.

Much has changed on All Things Considered since the program debuted on May 3, 1971. But there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block, with Beverly Amsler hosting on WVTF and RADIO IQ.  In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays.

All Things Considered airs Monday - Friday from 6:00 pm to 6:30 pm on RADIO IQ With BBC News

On the weekends, ATC is on 5:00-6:00 pm on WVTF and 6:00-7:00 PM on RADIO IQ and our RADIO IQ With BBC News service.

Local Host(s): 
Beverly Amsler
Composer ID: 
5187f8dce1c8221ab9bfee4c|5187f8c5e1c84d4a4b12563e

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All Tech Considered
5:40 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

What We're Watching As World's Big Hackers Meet In Las Vegas

Hackers attend the 2011 Def Con conference in Las Vegas. The 2013 conference as well as the Black Hat hacker conference kicks off this week.
Isaac Brekken AP

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 9:01 pm

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U.S.
5:27 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Statue Brings Friction Over WWII Comfort Women To California

South Korean police stand guard beside a comfort woman statue in front of the Japanese embassy in Seoul in May. The Southern California city of Glendale will dedicate an identical statue on Tuesday.
Chung Sung-Jun Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 9:01 pm

For decades, Koreans have been pushing to preserve the legacy of women forced to provide sex to Japanese army soldiers during World War II. Glendale, Calif., will dedicate a statue memorializing the victims, known as "comfort women," on Tuesday. But the statue has spurred controversy in this Southern California city, where some area residents say it is a divisive reminder of the horrors of war.

The sculpture is a bronze statue of a young girl. She looks about 14 — around the same age as many comfort women when they were forced into military brothels run by Japan's imperial army.

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Law
5:27 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Legal Battles Over Land Rights, Pipelines Are On The Rise

The Crosstex NGL Pipeline is just one such project in the country that has forced long, unwanted legal battles between oil companies and landowners.
Mose Buchele KUT

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 9:01 pm

At Margaret O'Keefe's farm in East Texas, they grow high-quality Bermuda grass. The fields are flat and vibrant green, surrounded by woods of a darker, richer green. The family loves this land. O'Keefe inherited it from her mother, who divided it among eight children.

"She used to call it 'enchanted valley,' " O'Keefe says.

But her "enchanted valley" also lies in the path of the Crosstex NGL Pipeline.

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Environment
4:50 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Once Resilient, Trees In The West Now More Vulnerable To Fires

The remains of a tree are seen in front of a boulder in the Dome Wilderness area of New Mexico in August 2012. The Las Conchas Fire torched the land in 2011, burning through more than 150,000 acres of forest.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 2:24 pm

On any given day, there's a wildfire burning somewhere in the U.S. — and that's not necessarily a bad thing. Many western forests have evolved with fire, and actually benefit from the occasional wildfire.

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Around the Nation
4:47 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Baltimore Activists Use Art And The Web To Fight Blight

Street artists Nether (top) and Tefcon install a mural in the Johnston Square neighborhood of East Baltimore.
Christopher Connelly NPR

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 9:01 pm

The Johnston Square neighborhood of East Baltimore used to be a thriving, working-class community. But that was a long time ago.

"I don't see kids playing games like we used to play, like the girls playing jacks and skipping jump-rope," says Richard Dean, who has lived here his whole life. "To me that is sad."

Most of the once-tidy row houses on the block sit empty; boarded up, cornices cracking, brick walls warped from water damage. Dean says the sense of community he grew up with disappeared as the neighborhood's population dwindled.

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