2017 General Assembly Coverage

The 2017 General Assembly session began in Richmond on January 11th and will adjourn on February 25th. It will be Governor Terry McAuliffe's last session as governor of Virginia.

Republicans hold control of both the House of Delegates and the Senate, which means support for McAuliffe's proposals are up in the air. 

Some parts of the governor’s agenda, though, have already gained bipartisan support. Like expanding mental health screening to keep people with behavioral disorders out of jails. Or criminal justice reforms, like increasing the dollar amount of what qualifies as a grand larceny. Other parts of the agenda are sure to cause conflict. 

Keep up with all RADIO IQ/Virginia Public Radio reporting from the General Assembly here.

Steve Helber / AP

 

Last year, public health officials in Virginia declared a public health emergency — the dramatically increasing opioid epidemic that continues to spiral out of control. As Michael Pope tells us, it’s an issue that has the attention of lawmakers in Richmond.

 

Steve Helber / AP

 

Lawmakers from across Virginia are in Richmond this week for the opening of the General Assembly session, which will last through the end of next month. 

NPR

Heading into the legislative session, both of Virginia’s lawmaking bodies remain controlled by Republicans. Two special elections in the state senate yesterday could have possibly flipped that control.

Dave Nakayama / Creative Commons

In 1995, Virginia abolished parole -- a change that led to crowding of state prisons and longer stays behind bars.  Now, small cracks have developed in the legal wall that keeps about 30,000 people locked up.  Sandy Hausman reports on changes that could free some inmates.

Doug Francis / Flickr

Lawmakers from across Virginia are in Richmond this week for the opening of the General Assembly session, which will last through the end of next month. Michael Pope has this preview.

Pages