Tab O'Neal

In addition to serving as local host during Morning Edition, Tab O'Neal also anchors the state and regional newscasts .

Tab began his broadcasting career in 1974 as an announcer and newscaster for a Las Vegas, NV radio station. From there he worked in both radio news and music in Salt Lake City, Southern California, Washington DC and Norfolk, VA. From February of 1990 to February 2011, Tab held a variety of on-air positions at Lynchburg/Roanoke's WSET-TV. At Channel 13, Tab was host of Good Morning Virginia and The Heart of Virginia; reported on area news; and was an NWA Certified Operational Meteorologist forecaster for the 6:00 & 11:00 PM newscasts.

Tab is also an artist, writer, poet and video producer.  As an avid NPR and WVTF/RADIO IQ listener, he enjoys putting his skills and talents to work on NPR’s Morning Edition.

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Designed to Save Money
4:00 am
Thu December 19, 2013

Passivhaus & Energy Efficiency

The Specht House in Thaxton, VA
Credit www.jetsongreen.com

According to Virginia Dominion Power the average monthly residential electric bill in the state is $119.82 a month. 

With the deep temperatures of winter and depending on our heat source we can find bills for a single month two to three times that amount.

But there's a method of home construction that for one homeowner has cut their electric bill by more than half the state average.

“Our typical energy bill is actually as low as $40 to as high as $62 to $65 so far. Our annual energy usage is so much lower than a standard home’s”  

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Environment
7:46 am
Thu December 5, 2013

Chesapeake Bay Water Quality Slowly Improving

Credit www.wjla.com

The Chesapeake Bay has been a repository for nitrogen, phosphorous and sediment loads to the point that its water quality is endangered. The Bay Barometer: Health and Restoration in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed is a report from the Chesapeake Bay Program that looks at ecological markers, like underwater grasses and fish, to measure progress in restoration goals.

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National Weather Service
2:13 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

Upper Air Observations

Credit NOAA

It is most common at this time of year for scientific weather instruments to be found in the woods and forests.

Phil Hysell of the National Weather Service says what goes up-in this case miniature weather stations known as radiosondes-does come down.

Radiosondes are launched into the atmosphere twice a day across the country and can reach heights of over 100,000 feet. During their ascent, these devices send back valuable measurements of temperature, humidity, pressure and wind direction and speed that go into weather forecast models.

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Liberal Arts Curriculum
11:40 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Humanities in Action

Liberal arts colleges represent about 4% of the entire cohort of college students who are going to be educated in one year. That’s a very small percentage that schools and even business leaders would like to see increased.

 

Tab O'Neal reports.

Gary Phillips is Dean of the College at Wabash College in Crawfordsville Indiana where they have been researching the impact of the “Humanities” on college students, graduates and the society at large.

They’re still mining the data of a study of 19,000 students from 49 institutions and Phillips says there are some key components of an effective liberal arts curriculum. "Undergraduate research with faculty, diversity experiences, service learning, high academic challenge and rigor; direct engagement with faculty and staff-who get into the lives of students up to their elbows-and provide opportunities to think diversely and engage persons different from them.”

Phillips calls those, “High Impact Practices,” and says their research shows measurable results in many student outcomes,  “Cognitive skill development, critical thinking, a sense of well-being, an ability to navigate conflict in diverse settings. We see when these high impact measure art put in place students change.”

Phillips says the age-old tension between breadth and specificity in education is one where a pendulum swings from one side-technical specific training--to the other-the humanities. He says it is the duty of liberal arts schools to make sure there is breadth.  “And that you also have represented in the majors that you have specificity and you have to have balance for effective education to take place.”

Phillips says there are important questions that need to be addressed when we consider the education of our children, “What is it that we are preparing the student to become in this day and age. What kind of man, what kind of woman. What kind of civic contributor. What is it about the human condition in our country that necessitates thinking about what we’re doing with therm in the classroom.”

Phillips says there are many attributes in a student of the humanities that employers look for beyond the task specific skills, “…individuals who can think about moral choices, who can write, who are able to communicate; who are able to discern differences and able to make a reasoned and informed judgment about their own culture and their set of values in contrast to others.”

20th at 7 p.m.
 

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Monarch Butterflies & Weather
7:23 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Monarch Butterfly Migration May Disappoint This Year

Credit www.monarchwatch.org

A fall tradition is to catch the monarch migration in late September and Early October. This year, however, there may not be much to see.

It takes four generations and up to 3,000 miles for the monarch migration to make its roundtrip each year. Virginia is one of the many and varied locations in which one generation of the monarch will breed.

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