Tab O'Neal

In addition to serving as local host during Morning Edition, Tab O'Neal also anchors the state and regional newscasts .

Tab began his broadcasting career in 1974 as an announcer and newscaster for a Las Vegas, NV radio station. From there he worked in both radio news and music in Salt Lake City, Southern California, Washington DC and Norfolk, VA. From February of 1990 to February 2011, Tab held a variety of on-air positions at Lynchburg/Roanoke's WSET-TV. At Channel 13, Tab was host of Good Morning Virginia and The Heart of Virginia; reported on area news; and was an NWA Certified Operational Meteorologist forecaster for the 6:00 & 11:00 PM newscasts.

Tab is also an artist, writer, poet and video producer.  As an avid NPR and WVTF/RADIO IQ listener, he enjoys putting his skills and talents to work on NPR’s Morning Edition.

The “Black Lives Matter” movement has brought new light to the problem of racism in this country, and now that movement has a new tool - an animated map that shows membership in the Ku Klux Klan was far more widespread than historians suggested.

Bats and Halloween go wing in hand. They're shrouded in myth and lore and are the stuff of creepy tales and film. However, they are a very important part of our biodiversity and are being decimated by disease. Not a good thing.

Mark Ford is an Associate Professor and Unit Leader of the Cooperative Research Unit of the Virginia Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at Virginia Tech.  He says we have nine to 12 species of bats that can be found in Virginia:

About one of every six police departments is using body cameras to record the conduct of officers when they interact with the public, but more are joining the ranks now that federal funds are available to buy equipment.  

In Richmond, the American Civil Liberties Union warns that guidelines for the use of body cameras are critical.  Here’s director of the Virginia chapter - Claire Guthrie Gastenaga

“You know Virginia is all over the map.  I mean the situation -- the word we use is chaotic.”

A governor appointed Parole Review Commission heard testimony that parole, dramatically curtailed by the state legislature in the 1990s,  must be reinstated. Others say it's time to reconsider the efficacy of no parole.

A commission appointed to consider reinstating parole met in Richmond Monday to hear from experts on crime and punishment and from victims like Judy Choendley who said the men who killed her father should never be freed.

Last March Sweet Briar College's then Board and President announced that due to insurmountable financial challenges the school was closing. The news not only shocked the small Amherst County liberal arts school but alumnae from across the country. They rallied, formed Saving Sweet Briar, and through legal action and a new board and president the school stayed open. Tab O'Neal reports that while the doors are open, the future holds a lot of challenges: