Tab O'Neal

In addition to serving as local host during Morning Edition, Tab O'Neal also anchors the state and regional newscasts .

Tab began his broadcasting career in 1974 as an announcer and newscaster for a Las Vegas, NV radio station. From there he worked in both radio news and music in Salt Lake City, Southern California, Washington DC and Norfolk, VA. From February of 1990 to February 2011, Tab held a variety of on-air positions at Lynchburg/Roanoke's WSET-TV. At Channel 13, Tab was host of Good Morning Virginia and The Heart of Virginia; reported on area news; and was an NWA Certified Operational Meteorologist forecaster for the 6:00 & 11:00 PM newscasts.

Tab is also an artist, writer, poet and video producer.  As an avid NPR and WVTF/RADIO IQ listener, he enjoys putting his skills and talents to work on NPR’s Morning Edition.

From Galax to Radford, Roanoke,Richmond and Danville to Charlottesville gangs are in Virginia. Earlier this month there was a killing of a teen in Lynchburg that police say is gang related. 

While the numbers of gang members in the Commonwealth may not be as high as major metropolitan areas they do impact our communities.

In Virginia, underage sex trafficking is real. That's why the Commonwealth has created new and stronger laws and methods of saving the children being victimized. With these efforts comes the bitter-sweet challenge of the rescue of child and then the recovery.

 

Karl and Hari Berzins, along with their two children, live in a tiny home in Floyd County. Their whole home is smaller in square footage than the average living room. Much of the material is reclaimed: the roof, siding, and interior wood. In part two of our tiny home visit, we learn no space goes unused.

 

In 1974 the average new home in the U.S. was just shy of 1,700 square feet. By 2014 the average new home size was over 2,600 square feet.  Even with that trend there is an opposing one where homes are shrinking to sizes smaller than the average living room.

Today, we meet Karl and Hari Berzins who, along with their two children, live in a Floyd County home that's only 8 feet by 21 feet in total size.

Creative Commons, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

It is tick season, and that also means there is a risk of contracting Lyme disease. It’s often said the "Deer tick" is the source of the bacteria that causes the disease in humans but that is not so. The "Lonestar" tick is the one that is known as the deer tick, and that one is not involved in the disease in humans.

The culprit for people is the Blacklegged tick. Tab O’Neal spoke with David Gaines, State Public Health Etymologist with the Virginia Department of Health, about the tick – and how to avoid any encounters. 

David, describe the Blacklegged tick:

Pages