Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

Each year, for over a decade, about 30,000 Virginia kids were bused to Richmond’s museum district for a visit to the Story of Virginia, an exhibit featuring the usual portraits and artifacts.  Last year, the Virginia Historical Society closed the show and began a $20 million renovation, creating a modern new museum and a whole new experience for those interested in Virginia’s past. 

Flickr user Nayu Kim, Creative Commons

Less than a third of each dollar spent on higher education today goes to those who do the teaching.  The rest is spent on administration, campus maintenance and other services students expect for the often high tuitions they pay, but that situation may be changing as low-paid faculty members join unions and find new ways to get better compensation. 

Flickr user Ron Cogswell, Creative Commons

Fifty years ago, more than 75% of college faculty members were full-time and had tenure or were on track to get it.  Today, only a third are part of that elite group.  Many of those doing the teaching at American universities are poorly paid, have no job security and limited benefits.  Some have PhD’s but still qualify for government assistance to buy food.  

The general public might think of universities as places for learning - and that would make teaching a valued resource, but a growing number of people at the head of college classrooms are making less than the minimum wage, have no job security and no benefits.  In the first part of our series, we look at how a majority of college instructors are not tenured or even on track to full-time, tenured positions.

Rose Forp spent many years training adults in the workplace.  Over time, it dawned on her that she loved to teach.

Already in the U.S. this year, 20 children have died after being left in hot cars, prompting warnings from police and public health departments.   Williamsburg recently declared a heat emergency, and Richmond and its residents took action.

Richmond opened three special cooling centers where people could go to escape temperatures in the 90’s, and officials reminded residents to drink plenty of water.  Rob Lawrence, who oversees the city’s fleet of 43 ambulances, says people seem to have gotten the message.