Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

Earl Swift

Virginia loves its classic cars.  Every year, there are dozens of events scheduled around the state to celebrate everything from the Model-T to muscle cars. 

A Virginia author says automobiles are key to our past, and he’s written a book that details the history of Detroit, the Commonwealth and a 1957 Chevy wagon owned by more than a dozen Virginians. 

During his years as a reporter for the Virginian Pilot, Earl Swift had an idea.

Texting is now a routine part of life for many people - especially teenagers, who often sleep with their phones so they don’t miss anything. 

At Virginia Commonwealth University, social scientists are looking at positive ways to use the power of texting with teens.

Kaiser Health News

Year after year, we discover new things about human behavior, the ways we learn, think and behave, but how accurate are those studies?  A team in Virginia set out to answer that question -to see if the study were done again, would findings be the same.  What they found has shaken the world of social science.

Sandy Hausman

Wind farms are now common in some western and Midwestern states, and that form of energy is actually cheaper than power produced with coal. Virginia could see its first wind farm on a ridge near Roanoke, but area residents and environmentalists are raising red flags over plans to install 25 turbines.

Many electric companies are replacing conventional home meters with smart devices that can be read, as well as turned on and off from a remote location.  These devices can also tell customers how much power they’re using at different times of day, and since some companies charge higher rates during periods of peak demand, consumers can adjust their power use to save money.  Dominion Virginia Power has a pilot program that charges customers less for power during times when demand is low.  The firm e-mails prices the night before, but one consumer says Dominion needs to do more if it’s seriou

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