Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

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Emerald Ash Borer
8:28 am
Wed June 11, 2014

A Deadly Threat Returns to the Shenandoah National Park

Credit www.emeraldashborer.info

As the Shenandoah National Park prepares to host thousands of summer visitors, it’s also hoping to get rid of some uninvited guests. 65 Emerald Ash Borers turned up in a trap near its northern border, and park rangers note this bug has already killed 50-million trees in other parts of the country. 

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Jefferson and His Maps
7:22 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Thomas Jefferson: More Than Just a President

Thomas Jefferson is well known as the author of the Declaration of Independence and as this country’s third president, but a new book shows him in another important role, as a geographer. 

In the age of GPS, few of us give much thought to maps, but in Thomas Jefferson’s time, they were rarely used to find your way.  More likely, you’d have a series of written directions describing landmarks where you should turn or go straight.  But Thomas Jefferson knew that nations vying to control North America needed accurate, way-finding maps.

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Entrepreneur Initiative
4:40 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Another Way to Draw Blood

Credit Photo: Dan Addison/University of Virginia

People who spend much time in an American hospital may begin to feel like they’re surrounded by vampires. 

Blood testing is a key part of modern medicine, and patients may be subject to dozens of needle sticks over the course of a week.  Now, a device developed by students at the University of Virginia could change all that. 

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Part 2 of 2
2:07 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

"Situation Room" for Patient Safety

Credit UVA Medical Center

The University of Virginia Medical Center admits more than 28,000 patients a year and does nearly 54,000 outpatient surgeries.  

When you’re dealing with so many sick people, things are bound to occasionally go wrong, but the federal government ranks UVA below the national average in five of thirteen categories linked to patient safety.  That one man is leading the charge to eliminate medical mistakes at UVA, and he’s set up a war room to do the job.
 

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Part 1 of 2
6:47 am
Mon June 2, 2014

"Room of Errors" Saves Lives

Credit www.ipe.virginia.edu

Modern medicine can be complicated - relying on high-tech procedures and multiple medications, so it’s no surprise that medical mistakes occur.  One study estimates they lead to 400,000 preventable deaths a year and ten times as many serious injuries.  To attack that problem, the University of Virginia Medical Center has launched a pilot program called “The Room of Errors.”  

  

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