Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

State lawmakers will soon consider a bill that could make it easier for convicted sex offenders to find employment when they get out of prison.  It passed easily in the Senate, but it may fail in the House, and at least one expert thinks it might not make that much difference.
 

Advocates of medical marijuana scored another small victory this week in Richmond. 

A Senate committee voted to allow cancer patients to use an oil derived from the cannabis plant - a medication that can already be used, legally, in patients with epilepsy.  Studies suggest cannabidiol may help to fight breast, colon, brain, lung and other cancers while reducing the side effects of conventional chemotherapy. 

The news pleases one Virginia woman who is anxious to have legal access.

Medication is exempt from sales tax in Virginia, and one other category could be included in that group if the legislature approves.  Lawmakers are considering a bill to stop taxing feminine hygiene products.

Delegate Mark Keam of Vienna says a female staffer convinced him that the legislature needed to look at a new category of products that women of child-bearing age buy – tampons and sanitary napkins.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_keyboard

California has approved a new set of laws to protect the privacy of data, and with half of all e-mails in this country passing through data centers in Virginia, this could be the next state to take action. The legislature is considering bills that would require police to get a search warrant if they want a look at your electronic files.

The law is clear about what police need to search your house or car.

Usually, a warrant is required. But what about electronic data? At the

Creative Commons, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Virginia’s Governor has proposed a series of changes to public education aimed at preparing students to join the workforce, but the state’s teachers may not like some of his ideas.  

Terry McAuliffe wants to set new requirements for high school grads, emphasize hands-on instruction, and offer industry credentials.  He thinks schools should be allowed to hire industry experts to teach on a temporary or part-time basis, but at the Virginia Education Association, which represents teachers, President Meg Gruber has doubts when it comes to science and math.

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