Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

Associated Press

The Shenandoah National Park recently closed two trails because of reports that bears were getting too close to hikers. In Charlottesville, a bear was spotted outside a busy shopping center, and another turned up on the campus of James Madison University. These normally shy creatures who live on acorns and berries are taking unusual liberties with people.

It’s been nearly five years since an earthquake hit Virginia, toppling chimneys and brick walls, cracking foundations and toppling furniture.  No one was killed or seriously injured, and for many people, it’s just an exciting memory, but for some the quake may have produced a silent but dangerous problem for homeowners. 

Rex Hammock / Creative Commons

The University of Virginia is again at the center of a national debate about sexual assault - this time involving a woman who was so drunk she doesn’t remember what happened. 

fs-phil / Creative Commons

Local health departments are warning that this is baby bat season, increasing the risk of contracting rabies. More than fifty people have been treated in one public health district alone.

Following the mass murders and woundings in Orlando, one Virginia city wants lawmakers in Richmond and Washington to require background checks for people buying guns and to ban the sale of assault weapons and high capacity magazines. In response, some citizens began lying down on the floor of city council, and one man suggested the tragedy in Orlando was a hoax. 

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