Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

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Environment
10:11 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Tree Stewards: A Good Time to Plant

Robin Hanes and Marjie Giuliano potting trees.
Credit Charlottesville Area Tree Stewards

Charlottesville’s Farmers Market will offer a surprising commodity this fall.  Between the pumpkins and mums, buyers will find 500 trees - part of a push to get people planting in autumn.

Robin Hanes is a tree commissioner in the city of Charlottesville , so it’s no surprise to find her promoting planting of trees - but it seems odd, as the leaves are falling, to find her putting trees in the ground now.   Most people do their planting in the spring, but Hanes says that’s not ideal .

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Future Industry
4:00 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Bringing Back Virginia's Scallops

Virginia was once a big producer of bay scallops, but around 1930 a disease hit the sea grass beds that were home to those shellfish, and in 1933, two big storms wiped them out.  Today, scientists report early success in bringing the grass beds back – and with them, the scallops.

Thirty-eight-year-old Bo Lusk grew up on the Eastern Shore, hearing stories about scallops.

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The New Drug of Choice
6:19 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Virginia Not Immune to "Molly"

Police are waiting for results of an autopsy before closing the case of a 19-year-old University of Virginia student who died over the Labor Day weekend after taking a dose of the street drug known as Molly.  Police are warning the public against it.

Shelley Goldsmith was an honor student at UVA, and her father says she wasn’t one to use drugs, but shortly after midnight, at a rave in Washington, D.C., she may have ingested a powder known as Molly.

“It’s Ecstasy is what it is – MDMA.”

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Where Criminal Prosecutions Go Wrong
6:52 am
Wed September 4, 2013

UVA Law Professor on Convicting the Innocent

When DNA evidence began springing people from prison, prosecutors discovered just how unreliable eyewitnesses can be.  

Here in Virginia, 13 out of 16 cases of wrongful convictions involved inaccurate identifications.  That led the state to issue model procedures for dealing with witnesses, but after nearly two years, very few have put those recommendations into practice.

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Balancing Acidity
4:00 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Rivers on Rolaids

U.Va. environmental scientist Michael Pace and former U.Va. student Carol Yang conduct a water study.
Credit University of Virginia

Something surprising is happening to rivers in the eastern part of the United States.  Scientists from the Universities of Virginia and Maryland say human activities are changing the basic chemistry of the water.

In a survey of 97 rivers from Florida to New Hampshire over up to six decades, scientists have discovered the water becoming less acidic – a surprise in light of how much acid rain has fallen in this part of the world.

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