Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

There’s been a lot of controversy surrounding massive open online courses at the college level -classes taught online, but the state of Virginia is moving full-speed ahead with an online program for high school students. 

Sweet Briar Saved

Jun 22, 2015

Sweet Briar College is back in business - at least for the coming academic year.  Virginia’s attorney general brokered a deal that will bring a new board of directors and president to the Amherst campus. 

The University of Virginia has taken another step in its quest to raise awareness of what enslaved people contributed to UVA during its early years.

 

At a special ceremony, the school named a new dormitory for Isabella and William Gibbons, a married couple who lived and worked on campus before the Civil War.  Dr. Marcus Martin is co-chair of UVA’s commission on slavery.

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  The Environmental Protection Agency has ordered each state to cut back on emissions of carbon dioxide by 2030, and a new report shows Virginia will be nearly half-way there by 2020. 

The state has agreed to cut its rate of CO2 pollution by 38-percent, and at the Union of Concerned Scientists, Senior Energy Analyst Jeremy Richardson says the key is scaling back on coal.

“Virginia expects to retire 14 coal-fired generating units between 2012 and 2020, and that represents about 19% of the state’s coal fired generation.”  

Abortion clinics in Virginia thought they might have to close, since they were not able to meet tough new rules.

Under Governor Bob McDonnell, the Virginia Board of Health approved new requirements for abortion clinics – forcing them to follow the same rules as hospitals or shut down.  Supporters of the change said it was needed, because clinics posed a danger to women’s health.  This month, the state finished a routine semi-annual  inspection of all 18 facilities and found no serious flaws.  Erik Bodine is director of the Office of Licensure and Certification.

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