Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

UVA School of Nursing

Experts in public health say Virginia is battling two big problems – an epidemic of opioid abuse and the need to better control pain in patients with serious injuries or disease.  Now, a professor from the University of Virginia is stepping in to help with baseline information that could influence future laws and guidelines.  

Creative Commons

The return of hot weather is especially bad news for many of Virginia’s 30,000 prison inmates.  Half of the state’s correctional centers have no air conditioning in the places where inmates live, and conditions may be causing fights and medical problems behind bars.

Associated Press

Yesterday, in a story exclusive to WVTF and the Washington Post, reporter Sandy Hausman revealed new evidence in the case of a former UVA honors student, convicted in 1990 in the bloody murder of his girlfriend’s parents.  DNA analysis now appears to confirm what Jens Soering has been saying all along - that another man committed the crime.  Today, we look at additional evidence supporting Soering’s request for a pardon from the governor.

The Promise Movie

It’s been more than 30 years since police arrested Jens Soering, an honors student from the University of Virginia, and charged him with the brutal murder of his girlfriend’s parents in their Bedford County home.  To this day, Soering insists he is innocent, but he’s been turned down for parole nearly a dozen times.  Today, his lawyer filed a petition asking for a full pardon - citing new evidence that Soering is not guilty.  

University of Virginia School of Nursing

Medical schools today teach doctors and nurses how to talk with patients and their families about dying, but for millions of health care professionals trained in the 20th century, conversations about death are difficult. That’s why the University of Virginia plans its third annual conference on the subject.