Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

Sandy Hausman

Part I: A Pig Primer

For many families, ham is part of a holiday tradition.  The nation’s largest producer – Smithfield – is based in Virginia, and this state is home to more than a quarter of a million pigs.  This story is the first in a five-part series looking at the impact of a growing industry on the environment, on the animals and on public health.

David Sleboda and Thomas Roberts/ American Physiological Association

Most people would agree, there’s nothing beautiful about cancer or AIDS or any other disease, but scientists working to find cures see beauty in the pictures they take to better understand what they’re up against.  Now, Sandy Hausman reports there’s an exhibit of those images, providing a chance for the public to see how exciting biology can be. 

Olga R. Rodriguez / AP

 

Democrats rallied in Richmond Sunday – urging Congress to fulfill President-Elect Trump’s promise of better healthcare for the nation.  Senator Tim Kaine says he’s hopeful lawmakers will not repeal the Affordable Care Act without providing an acceptable replacement.  

Sandy Hausman / WVTF / RADIO IQ

As Virginia’s General Assembly prepares to do business later this month, Governor McAuliffe is warning members not to introduce controversial bills that involve social policy.  He urged them to be tolerant and to focus on jobs, transportation and education. 

Creative Commons

Virginia’s Secretary of Public Safety – a former prosecutor – wants legislators to change the laws on shoplifting.  Virginia charges people with a felony if they steal anything valued at more than $200.  That’s the lowest of any state in the nation, but as Sandy Hausman reports, this could be the year when the General Assembly votes to raise the so-called larceny threshold.

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