Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

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Part 5 of 5
5:00 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Crisis in Correctional Care: Pressing for Prison Reform

By the end of this year, California must release 9,600 prisoners from the nation’s largest correctional system, because the Supreme Court says overcrowding makes it impossible to provide adequate healthcare for inmates.

Failing to do so constitutes cruel and unusual punishment - a violation of the U.S. Constitution.  Virginia’s prisons are also crowded and facing a lawsuit over medical care that will be heard this spring, but on other reasons for change in the Commonwealth’s correctional centers.
 

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Facebook & Free Speech
4:41 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

The Case of Brandon Raub

Credit Photo Provided by United Truth Seekers

  A Virginia man is suing the F.B.I. and local police over his arrest for things he wrote on Facebook.  

It’s been nearly two years since 29-year-old Brandon Raub began posting things on his Facebook page – things that scared friends and the federal government.   Honorably discharged from the Marines after serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, Raub became convinced that  9/11 was a U.S. government conspiracy.  He wrote:

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Ethics, Law & Policy
2:15 pm
Sun April 6, 2014

Brave New World of Big Data

The price of collecting and analyzing massive amounts of information has dropped dramatically over the last decade, creating a new path for discovery in many fields, but the evolution of big data raises big questions that scholars in Virginia hope to address.   From medicine to marketing, from politics to police work, people are buzzing about the potential to learn and grow by collecting and analyzing huge amounts of information.  This brave new world of big data also raises ethical questions and concerns about public policy and the law.

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New Take on Landscape
5:16 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Painting with Dirt

Mike Heivly

Most painters work in water color, oil or acrylic, but one Virginia man is making his mark by painting with dirt.

Mike Heivly’s Dad was in the military, so his family moved around a lot, and in each new place, he noticed the dirt was different.  In some spots it was black – in others, red, and during one cross country trip, he decided to demonstrate its diversity.

“Every place that we stopped I got a little soil sample – evidence that I was there.  And then I did a series of paintings/prints  to document a movement across the continent.”

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News Series Submission, Part 1
4:48 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

Crisis in Correctional Care: The Series Begins

There are about 30,000 Virginians in state prisons, and Virginia spends more than $25,000 a year to house each of them, making the Department of Corrections the most expensive agency in Richmond, with a billion dollar annual budget. It spends $160 million on healthcare, but critics say that care is inadequate, and some inmates could be dying for lack of medical attention. 

Another 30,000 people are locked up in city or county jails, and as we hear in this series, their care is also questionable.
 

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