Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

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Environment
7:05 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Managing Virginia's Deer Population: Part 1

There are an estimated 30 million white-tailed deer in this country – 100 times more than a century ago, and in states like Virginia, predators that used to control their populations are gone. 

That leaves humans to manage herds of deer and the Commonwealth is trying to come up with a new plan to do that.

Native Americans  and early settlers depended on deer to supply them with meat and clothing, so there was probably not much objection to hunting them, but in the 20th century,  as many Americans moved to cities, another force shaped our perception of deer – Walt Disney.

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UVA Education Study
1:53 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

On the Minds of Middle-Schoolers.....

With regular reports these days about school shootings, you might expect kids to be somewhat nervous, but a new survey shows students in 453 middle schools around the state feel safe - and most like school.

University of Virginia Professor Dewey Cornell polled about 40,000 kids in 7th and 8th grades.  He found more than two thirds like school, feel comfortable asking teachers for help with school work, and feel safe.  Cornell says two elements were key to those positive findings - structure and support.
 

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Environment
10:11 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Tree Stewards: A Good Time to Plant

Robin Hanes and Marjie Giuliano potting trees.
Credit Charlottesville Area Tree Stewards

Charlottesville’s Farmers Market will offer a surprising commodity this fall.  Between the pumpkins and mums, buyers will find 500 trees - part of a push to get people planting in autumn.

Robin Hanes is a tree commissioner in the city of Charlottesville , so it’s no surprise to find her promoting planting of trees - but it seems odd, as the leaves are falling, to find her putting trees in the ground now.   Most people do their planting in the spring, but Hanes says that’s not ideal .

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Future Industry
4:00 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Bringing Back Virginia's Scallops

Virginia was once a big producer of bay scallops, but around 1930 a disease hit the sea grass beds that were home to those shellfish, and in 1933, two big storms wiped them out.  Today, scientists report early success in bringing the grass beds back – and with them, the scallops.

Thirty-eight-year-old Bo Lusk grew up on the Eastern Shore, hearing stories about scallops.

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The New Drug of Choice
6:19 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Virginia Not Immune to "Molly"

Police are waiting for results of an autopsy before closing the case of a 19-year-old University of Virginia student who died over the Labor Day weekend after taking a dose of the street drug known as Molly.  Police are warning the public against it.

Shelley Goldsmith was an honor student at UVA, and her father says she wasn’t one to use drugs, but shortly after midnight, at a rave in Washington, D.C., she may have ingested a powder known as Molly.

“It’s Ecstasy is what it is – MDMA.”

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