Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

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Diabetes and Vision
3:38 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

Preventing Blindess

More than 25 million Americans have diabetes, putting them at risk for eye damage that can lead to blindness. 

Often, problems occur before the disease is diagnosed, but doctors at the University of Virginia have made an exciting discovery that could protect or even restore vision.

Dr. Paul Yates is frustrated.  As a professor of ophthalmology at the University of Virginia, he often sees people with diabetes who are going blind.  They didn’t come to him early enough to prevent problems, because sight is lost at the periphery, and central vision remains.

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A Cell with a View
8:50 am
Fri June 14, 2013

A Photographer's Project: The View Outside from the Inside

The Bridge: Some Other Places We've Missed
Credit Mark Strandquist

More than 33,000 people live behind bars in Virginia, and from their cells few have a view of the outside world, but a Richmond artist aims to change that.

If you were locked up for months, years or a lifetime and could look out a window, what would you most like to see?  That’s the question Mark Strandquist has put to inmates in Virginia jails and prisons.

“And then I go to that place, photograph it and bring the image to them, and then they write about it.”

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Arts & Culture
1:55 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

In Memory of a Civil Rights Activist

One of the nation’s most controversial artists has announced a surprising new work. It's a  living tribute to W.E.B. Dubois. Carrie Mae Weems is a photographer who has reached back in history to honor millions of people who never got their due – women, people of color, and now the early civil rights activist W.E.B. Dubois. 

On the 50th anniversary of his death, she began thinking about her favorite flower – and an unusual way to preserve the memory of Dubois.

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The Lying Game
7:43 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Deception Detection is Professor's Mission

Credit health.usnews.com

On average, people lie several times a day. Some of those lies are big ones but most are lies or deceptions we’ve come to live with if not accept or anticipate. A professor at Longwood University says deception is rampant in our culture and he’s looking for a way to help employers weed out dishonest applicants. 

Randy Boyle is an expert on cyber security and deception detection.  After 9/11 he got a government grant to help the feds find liars online, and Boyle returned with some tips on how to tell when a person is lying in an e-mail.

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Landowners Dispute
7:11 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Cuccinelli vs. Southwest VA Landowners?

VA Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli

There’s a new controversy brewing - one that could mean trouble for Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli.  It involves a lawsuit on behalf of landowners in Southwestern Virginia.

They claim two energy companies failed to pay them royalties on methane gas wells.  One of those firms has given $100,000 to Cuccinelli’s campaign - and now a judge in the case says she’s shocked by e-mails from the attorney general’s office to those energy companies.   Sandy Hausman reports on the history of the case.

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