Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

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Arts & Culture
5:06 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Opera in the Spotlight

Violist Elan Sapir practicing at Castleton Festival
Credit Suri Xia

It’s no secret that opera in America is struggling.  In 2008, only eight percent of adults said they liked opera, and only two percent had been to one in the past year, but here in Virginia that could be changing thanks to summer programs designed to build the base for opera.

It’s not unusual for opera goers to give long and enthusiastic ovations – for cast members to take bow after bow, but people who love this complex art form fear their audience may not always be there.

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Law & Crime
4:01 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

State Police Review ABC Arrest

Virginia’s Alcoholic Beverage Control director says he’s asked state police to review an incident last spring that landed a UVA sorority girl in jail and created a public firestorm.  

A Virginia civil liberties group says the legislature should also be involved. 

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Red-Cockaded Woodpecker
12:12 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Protecting One of Virginia's Most Endangered Birds

Credit Derrick Hamrick via Nature Conservancy

Pine forests were once common in this part of the world -- from New Jersey to Florida and west to Texas.  It was a rich environment for a small and smart little woodpecker that is now endangered.

When settlers first arrived in what is now the American southeast, they found 90 million acres of mature pines – the perfect material for home and ship construction – and something that had to come down so the newcomers could farm.  Today, only 3% of that ecosystem remains.

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Restaurant Gets National Attention
12:18 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Feast!

Credit Specialty Food Association

If you’re a foodie, chances are you’ve heard about Feast – a small, Central Virginia shop with a big reputation and a new reason to brag.  It was named Outstanding Retailer of the Year by the Specialty Food Association.

Feast was actually one of five stores in the nation to be honored, but it’s on the cover of the Specialty Food Association’s magazine.  Founded by Kate Collier and Eric Gertner, the store offers lots of local produce.

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Annual Swearing-In Ceremony
7:55 am
Fri July 5, 2013

New American Citizens

Monticello

Seventy nine people from 38 countries became U.S. citizens today, during the annual swearing in at the home of Thomas Jefferson.  The event drew more than 3,000 people – in part because the featured speaker was a Grammy-winning rock star.

It was an exciting day for people who had waited years to become citizens, with some extra sparkle thanks to rock star and speaker Dave Matthews, who was born in South Africa and became a citizen in 1980. 

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