Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

For many families, ham is part of a holiday tradition.  The nation’s largest producer – Smithfield – is based in Virginia, and this state is home to more than a quarter of a million pigs.  This story is the first in a five-part series looking at the impact of a growing industry on the environment, on the animals and on public health.

https://www.pluglesspower.com/

If you don’t have an electric car, the act of plugging one in might sound simple, but companies rarely go broke overestimating America’s love of convenience.

“Do you have a garage opener, or do you know anyone who does?”

That’s Ned Freeman, Vice President of Marketing for a Richmond company called Evatran.  It makes charging stations and pads that work automatically to revive a Nissan Leaf, Cadillac ELR or Chevy Volt.  

This is fashion week in New York, but with the advent of the Internet, the Big Apple isn’t the only American city laying claim to haute couture.  Several innovative apparel companies have put down roots in Richmond – among them a store and factory focused on blue jeans. 

In the old tobacco warehouse district, the company opened a small, tasteful showroom and, on the other side of a long window, a workshop where customers can watch nine people, using sewing machines and other tools, to make high end jeans, one pair at a time.

Virginia is in for several more weeks of winter, but spring fashions are on display in stores.  Most were designed in big, international cities like Paris or New York, but a growing number actually originated here in the Commonwealth.  In the first part of our series, Sandy Hausman looks at why clothing design is taking root in Richmond. 

The fashion runways of New York are more than 300 miles from Virginia’s capital city, but in the 21st century, cities have grown closer.  E.P. Cutler is a best-selling author and fashion historian.

State lawmakers will soon consider a bill that could make it easier for convicted sex offenders to find employment when they get out of prison.  It passed easily in the Senate, but it may fail in the House, and at least one expert thinks it might not make that much difference.
 

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