Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

The Commonwealth Institute

Just three days after Donald Trump was elected president, leaders of Virginia not-for-profit groups met in Richmond to prepare for battle – vowing to protect immigrants and the poor from a new administration that has pledged to deport the undocumented and repeal the Affordable Care Act.

This election year has been one of anger and dismay, but at the polls this morning, Sandy Hausman found moods to match Virginia’s mild, sunny weather.

Jeff Auth at English Wikipedia

When Bernie Sanders dropped out of the presidential race, many Democrats worried that college students – an important voting block for Barack Obama – might not vote this time around, but Sandy Hausman found strong interest when talking to students in Charlottesville and Richmond.

A new report from the University of Virginia shows about ten percent of students in this state’s public schools are absent for three weeks or more each year, and in three large districts the rates were even higher. 

When Professor Luke Miller and his colleagues graphed the number of kids who were chronically absent from public schools in Richmond, Petersburg and Norfolk, they ended up with something resembling the letter U:

Virginia is already spending over a billion dollars a year on its department of corrections - a system responsible for more than 30,000 prisoners.  To meet the social and spiritual needs of some, it depends on volunteers from a Christian group called Grace Inside.  

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