Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

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Health & Medicine
2:01 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

VA Abortion Clinic Inspection Report

Abortion clinics in Virginia thought they might have to close, since they were not able to meet tough new rules.

Under Governor Bob McDonnell, the Virginia Board of Health approved new requirements for abortion clinics – forcing them to follow the same rules as hospitals or shut down.  Supporters of the change said it was needed, because clinics posed a danger to women’s health.  This month, the state finished a routine semi-annual  inspection of all 18 facilities and found no serious flaws.  Erik Bodine is director of the Office of Licensure and Certification.

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Arts & Culture
11:23 am
Fri June 12, 2015

Father Figure: An Alternative Notion of Black Fatherhood

Jerell Willis, with Fidel (2011-2014) Image courtesy of the artist
Credit Zune Lee

It’s been fifty years since a top official at the Labor Department released a report on African-American families, and now – as part of the Look3 Festival  in Charlottesville – a show called Father Figure disputes that report.  Andrea Douglas is Executive Director of the African-American Heritage Center.

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Part 3 of 3
4:00 am
Wed June 10, 2015

Offshore Wind Power: New Technologies

A poll by the National Resources Defense Council shows 88% of Virginians want the state to use more wind and solar power, and the federal government has offered the state $47 million to build a couple of turbines offshore, but Dominion Power is hesitant. 

Virginia is blessed with 112 miles of coastline. Twenty-seven miles out, the water is still relatively shallow, making it ideal for construction of wind turbines, and there’s usually a steady ocean breeze.

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Part 2 of 3
9:43 am
Tue June 9, 2015

Offshore Wind Power: No Promises for VA's Coast

Energinet Control Center

Dominion Virginia Power has leased land offshore for a wind park, but it’s not clear when construction might begin. 

The company says a demonstration project is needed to guide future development, but the cost to build a couple of turbines offshore is too high. 

In Denmark – which has more than 30 years of experience – experts say driving costs down is the name of the game, and they’re happy to share their secrets with Virginia. 

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Part 1 of 3
4:00 am
Mon June 8, 2015

Offshore Wind Power: From Denmark to Virginia

Middlegruden Wind Farm

This year, the federal government said it would give nearly $47 million to each of three states hoping to develop offshore wind power – Virginia, New Jersey and Oregon. 

Virginia said it would partner with Dominion Power to build a demonstration project, but the utility now says it can’t get started, because installing a couple of turbines is too expensive.  Meanwhile, Denmark reports it’s getting nearly 40% of its power from wind.  How did such a tiny country do that, and what could we learn from the Danes? 

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