Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

Creative Commons

Richmond is known for its historic capital building, its stately cemeteries, a world class art museum and, now, a stellar ambulance service.  The National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians voted to honor Richmond for innovation. 

“Paramedics.  What’s the address you need an ambulance to come to?  Okay, tell me exactly what happened.”

Each year, more than 60,000 people in Richmond require an ambulance.  That’s a big number for a city with fewer than 220,000 residents - but Danny Garrison, director of communications, says the rush hour brings a much bigger crowd.

The Race Is On

Sep 18, 2015

Virginia’s capital city is gearing up for something it’s never seen before – an international bike race featuring a thousand cyclists and more than a quarter of a million fans.

If you watched the Tour de France on TV, you have some idea of what Richmond is about to experience.  Beginning Saturday, cyclists will fill the roads, warming up and competing in various categories, time trials and races.

Find the Art Doors

Sep 17, 2015

The city of Richmond is hosting an unusual art show featuring more than three dozen doors.  They’re on display across town, and sponsors have offered a prize for people who can find and photograph all forty of them. 

Hundreds of prison inmates in Virginia file grievances each year over the health care they get or don’t get behind bars.  Now, the state has agreed to settle a lawsuit filed on behalf of 1,200 prisoners.

It’s been more than three years since Abigail Turner, an attorney with the Legal Aid Justice Center, filed a class action suit in federal district court, claiming inadequate care had caused prisoners’ health to deteriorate at the Fluvanna Correctional Center for Women.  She said some - like 47-year-old  Darlene White - had died.

Albemarle County prosecutors say they won’t seek the death penalty against Jesse Matthew, who has now been indicted for the 2009 kidnapping and murder of 20-year-old Virginia Tech student Morgan Harrington after a Metallica concert in Charlottesville.  He’s already facing a murder charge in connection with the death of 18-year-old UVA student Hannah Graham, and if convicted in that case, he could be executed.  Harrington’s parents, who were active in the search for their daughter’s killer, were in court today as the charges were read.