Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

fs-phil / Creative Commons

Local health departments are warning that this is baby bat season, increasing the risk of contracting rabies. More than fifty people have been treated in one public health district alone.

Following the mass murders and woundings in Orlando, one Virginia city wants lawmakers in Richmond and Washington to require background checks for people buying guns and to ban the sale of assault weapons and high capacity magazines. In response, some citizens began lying down on the floor of city council, and one man suggested the tragedy in Orlando was a hoax. 

AP Photo/Steve Helber

On Wednesday, Dominion will hold its annual meeting, and some observers expect fireworks, as activist shareholders propose changes in the way the company is run.  The push for more green power was launched by one woman who’s been crusading for years.  

Wikimedia Commons

With rain still falling and heavy fog surrounding the Shenandoah National Park, firefighters took a break, announcing that the blaze is largely contained and many of the trees have survived. 

Wikimedia Foundation

The term “bird brain” is used to imply stupidity, but a new book by Jennifer Ackerman suggests our feathered friends are anything but.  It's called the Genius of Birds.

Since childhood, when she had a pet parakeet named Grisgris, Jennifer Ackerman has marveled at the intelligence of birds.

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