Robbie Harris

WVTF/RADIO IQ New River Valley Bureau Chief

Robbie Harris is based in Blacksburg,  covering the New River Valley and southwestern Virginia. 

The former news director of  WBEZ/ Chicago Public Radio and WHYY in Philadelphia, she led award-winning news teams and creative projects.  Early in her career, she was the Humanities Reporter at New Hampshire Public Radio, and also served as a tape editor on Fresh Air with Terry Gross.

Robbie worked at New Jersey Public Television and WCAU/CBS TV in Philadelphia while she pursued  her Master's Degree at the University of Pennsylvania.  During college, she was a Page at Saturday Night Live in New York and a reporter and program host for Cross Country Cable Television in Somerville, NJ.  Robbie also worked at the Rutgers College Radio Station, WRSU and was part of the team which founded "Knight Time Television" at the university.

Robbie Harris

New River Valley residents had a chance to question officials of the Radford Army Ammunitions Plant, known as the Arsenal, at a community meeting. The plant has long been a controversial neighbor to its surrounding communities in southwestern Virginia.  Its quarterly community meetings, like the one at the Christiansburg Library December 14, may be helping foster a dialogue that could benefit both camps.    

Edmèe Rodriguez-Hasler

It seems like every day we hear about a new technology that we’re told will change our lives.  But with the push toward the latest and greatest new gizmo, is something important being overlooked?   A recent symposium at Virginia Tech explored the question of what it means to be human in an increasingly technological world.  

Alyson Taylor

A treatment being tested for brain cancer in dogs may one day help humans with the same disease. Clinical trials at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg are showing promising results and a new round of trials is set to start early next year. 

Hearings by Virginia’s Water Control Board begin this week in Richmond on two proposed natural gas pipelines for Virginia.   

Experts will gather in Roanoke tomorrow night to discuss how gas pipelines, slated to be built in Virginia, might affect human health. They’ll compare renewable energy with natural gas and explore how each impacts water and land, --as well as physical and mental health.

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