Michel Martin

Michel McQueen Martin is an Emmy Award–winning American journalist and correspondent for ABC News and National Public Radio. Martin, who came to NPR in January 2006 to develop the program, has spent more than 25 years as a journalist — first in print with major newspapers and then in television. Tell Me More marks her debut as a full-time public radio show host. "What makes public radio special is that it's got both intimacy and reach all at once. For the cost of a phone call, I can take you around the world. But I'm right there with you in your car, in your living room or kitchen or office, in your iPod. Radio itself is an incredible tool and when you combine that with the global resources of NPR plus the commitment to quality, responsibility and civility, it's an unbeatable combination."

While working on the development of Tell Me More, Martin also served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines and talk shows, including Talk of the Nation and News & Notes.

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Michel Martin, Going There
7:03 am
Tue April 21, 2015

What Can #NOLASCHOOLS Teach Us?

Teacher Towana Pierre-Floyd in her classroom at New Orleans West in 2005. It's a structured charter school set up for students and teachers displaced by the storm.
Pat Sullivan AP

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 10:38 pm

What if you had to start your school system over almost from scratch? What if most of the buildings were unusable, and most of the teachers had left or been fired? Is that a nightmare, or your dream come true?

In New Orleans, that was the reality after the flooding that followed Hurricane Katrina. That set off a chain reaction that transformed the city's schools forever, first by a state takeover and then by the most extensive charter school system in the country.

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Michel Martin, Going There
3:21 am
Tue April 7, 2015

New Orleans Educator Dreams Of Teaching Tech To Beat The Streets

New Orleans educator Jonathan Johnson is founder and CEO of the Rooted School.
Jonathan Johnson

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 5:49 pm

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, much has been rebuilt in New Orleans — including the public schools. But the current education system is radically different from the one that people who grew up in New Orleans remember. Virtually all students in the city now attend charter schools. Many of their teachers are both new to New Orleans and new to teaching.

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Race
5:45 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Fear Of The Black Man: How Racial Bias Could Affect Crime, Labor Rates

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 6:23 pm

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with professors Phillip Atiba Goff of UCLA and Harry Holzer of Georgetown University about how fears of African-American men are manifested in the criminal justice system and the labor market, and what that means for the broader African-American community.

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Michel Martin, Going There
9:48 am
Mon February 23, 2015

Becoming American: Immigrants Tweet Their Stories

Writer Edwidge Danticat at around 10 years-old with her brother Bob and cousin Nick in Haiti. She joined her parents in the U.S. a couple of years later. She describes it as a tough landing.
Edwidge Danticat

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 4:51 pm

Immigration is a subject of intense political debate but it is also the subject of great art. For centuries, American writers and performers of all backgrounds have grappled with what it means to cross land and water — sometimes by choice, sometimes not — to take up life in a new world.

On Feb. 24, I will be joined in Miami by some of the country's most exciting young writers and performers who have also made such journeys and who have taken up the vital task of telling us what it means.

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Michel Martin, Going There
3:57 am
Fri February 6, 2015

Out Of The Shadows, TV Star Shines A Light On Immigration

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 1:52 pm

On Capitol Hill, the immigration debate is a political story. But for millions of people across the country, it is something deeper. "This is not a political issue; it is a human issue," says Diane Guerrero. "Me and my parents were a family, and now we're not. We're separated."

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