Michel Martin

Michel McQueen Martin is an Emmy Award–winning American journalist and correspondent for ABC News and National Public Radio. Martin, who came to NPR in January 2006 to develop the program, has spent more than 25 years as a journalist — first in print with major newspapers and then in television. Tell Me More marks her debut as a full-time public radio show host. "What makes public radio special is that it's got both intimacy and reach all at once. For the cost of a phone call, I can take you around the world. But I'm right there with you in your car, in your living room or kitchen or office, in your iPod. Radio itself is an incredible tool and when you combine that with the global resources of NPR plus the commitment to quality, responsibility and civility, it's an unbeatable combination."

While working on the development of Tell Me More, Martin also served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines and talk shows, including Talk of the Nation and News & Notes.

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Michel Martin, Going There
6:03 am
Wed June 24, 2015

#StreetsAndBeats: How Do Cops And Communities Build Trust?

A Los Angeles Police Department car follows protesters as they march near the city's 77th Street police station last August. It was a protest of the fatal LAPD shooting of Ezell Ford.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Thu June 25, 2015 4:12 pm

Their lives and deaths are now a part of the public record, their names part of a tragic roll call: Rodney King, Michael Brown, Ezell Ford, Eric Garner, Walter Scott, Freddie Gray, Rekia Boyd and Tanisha Anderson. They are just some of the Americans who've been killed or harmed in encounters with police. But does it have to be that way? How do we get beyond violence and deep-seated animosities in a relationship where conflict is a part of the job?

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Michel Martin, Going There
7:35 am
Sat June 20, 2015

Sen. Tim Scott: Charleston Shooting Was 'A Crime Of Hate'

U.S. Sen. Tim Scott bows his head in prayer during a prayer vigil held at Morris Brown AME Church on Thursday, June 18, 2015 in Charleston, S.C. The service honored victims of Wednesday's shooting at Emanuel AME Church.
Grace Beahm AP

Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., returned to his home state the day after nine people were killed in Charleston's Emanuel AME Church. The crime was emotionally devastating for many of his constituents, and the senator himself lost a friend in the attack. He took time out for a wide ranging conversation about the shooting, what he believes may have caused it, and how he'd like his state — and the country — to move forward. A version of the interview aired on Here & Now.

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Michel Martin, Going There
6:50 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

#MotorCityDrive: Is Detroit's Economic Engine Roaring Back To Life?

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 8:29 pm

For generations of Americans, Detroit was the place where people made things: powerful cars, amazing architecture, beautiful music. But now Detroit is entering a new chapter. After months of often tense and difficult negotiations, Detroit is now formally out of bankruptcy. Millions of dollars of contributions from private foundations and corporations helped the city preserve its acclaimed art collection. A new generation of artists and entrepreneurs, doers and makers is calling Detroit home. So we'd like to ask, what's next? What will drive Detroit's future now?

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Michel Martin, Going There
5:04 am
Fri May 15, 2015

What's Driving The Motor City Forward Now?

Six months after declaring bankruptcy was over, can Detroit celebrate?
Paul Sancya ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Fri May 15, 2015 2:13 pm

For decades, when most Americans thought about Detroit, they probably thought about the auto industry, or maybe the music of Aretha, Smokey or Diana Ross and the Supremes. More recently, they might have thought of Detroit as the poster child for municipal bankruptcy. But what about now, as the city faces a new chapter?

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Michel Martin, Going There
5:33 am
Thu April 30, 2015

Looting And Rioting? First Responders Remember 1968

Michel Martin's father was a New York City firefighter in 1968, when race riots erupted in neighborhoods across the city and country. His memorial card sits on his dented helmet from those years.
Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 3:24 pm

Scenes from Baltimore earlier this week have evoked the riots that broke out in many cities after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King in 1968. I spoke to two first responders who were on duty at the time, Ed Mattson, a retired sergeant from the Baltimore City Police who was in the tactical squad and riot squad in 1968, and Steve Souder, Director of Communications at Fairfax County Department of Public Safety. He was working in communications for the Washington D.C. Fire Department the day Dr. King died. It also made me think of my own father.

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