Maureen Corrigan

AP Photo/Steve Helber

On Wednesday, Dominion will hold its annual meeting, and some observers expect fireworks, as activist shareholders propose changes in the way the company is run.  The push for more green power was launched by one woman who’s been crusading for years.  

Airbnb: Who Writes the Rules?

4 hours ago
jm3 on Flickr, Creative Commons

A deadly shooting last month at an Airbnb rental in Virginia Beach is casting a tragic shadow over this week’s meeting of a Virginia Housing Commission work group. The commission panel is set to take up a contentious issue that was unresolved from the General Assembly session: How should the state regulate Airbnb?

Virginia Public Access Project

An April cold snap all but wiped out the peach crop in Virginia's northern Shenandoah Valley...and there's some confusion about an effort to revive the oyster population off Virginia Beach. Those have been among the most read stories this week at the Virginia Public Access Project's VaNews link on vpap.org.

Cold Brew Coffee is Hot Trend

May 8, 2016
Mallory Noe-Payne/WVTF

Temperatures are starting to rise, and that may mean it’s time to trade in your hot cup of coffee in the morning for something different.

Cold brew coffee is a quickly growing sector of the caffeine marketplace, and a new company in Virginia is finding a way to cash in. 

Ron Cogswell/Flickr

This fall, for the first time, more students of color walked into public schools for first grade than white students. But even as this country gets more diverse, many school systems still remain segregated.

To help understand why, and what can be done, a professor at Virginia Commonwealth University compared approaches to integration taken by four different southern cities. The least successful was right here in Virginia. 

Newly released numbers from the Census Bureau show Virginia added more than 160,000 people last year, although that growth wasn’t distributed evenly. As Michael Pope tells us, some of Virginia’s most urban areas lost more people than they gained.

The GOP Case against Restoring Felon Rights

May 6, 2016
Mallory Noe-Payne

Does Governor Terry McAuliffe have the power to automatically restore voting rights to former felons who have served their time? The governor and his lawyers say they do. But Republicans may be on the verge of launching a lawsuit challenging that.

Virginia House Republicans Weigh In on Gridlock

May 6, 2016

Frustration is growing in both parties on Capitol Hill because pressing national issues are going unaddressed, which has led to some questioning whether the gridlock will hurt the Republican Party, which controls both chambers of Congress.

There are some places in the world that just speak to you. For one Virginia man it’s a place is tucked away in the Appalachian Mountains where an old house overlooks a creek that flows into the New River.  

Bear Cubs Emerge from Virginia Dens

May 5, 2016

Spring is well underway, and that means baby animals are everywhere.  Sometimes they get separated from their mothers and end up at the Wildlife Center of Virginia.  That’s where Sandy Hausman met an especially charming bear cub.

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Maureen Corrigan, book critic for NPR's Fresh Air, is a critic-in-residence and lecturer at Georgetown University. She is an associate editor of and contributor to Mystery and Suspense Writers (Scribner) and the winner of the 1999 Edgar Award for Criticism, presented by the Mystery Writers of America.

Corrigan served as a juror for the 2012 Pulitzer Prize in Fiction. Her book So We Read On: How The Great Gatsby Came To Be and Why It Endures was published by Little, Brown in September 2014 (paperback forthcoming May 2015). Corrigan is represented by Trinity Ray at The Tuesday Lecture Agency: trinity@tuesdayagency.com

Corrigan's literary memoir, Leave Me Alone, I'm Reading! was published in 2005. Corrigan is also a reviewer and columnist for The Washington Post's Book World. In addition to serving on the advisory panel of The American Heritage Dictionary, she has chaired the Mystery and Suspense judges' panel of the Los Angeles TimesBook Prize.

Mention Oscar Hijuelos and most people think The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love. And why not? It's his gorgeous second novel, the one that won him the Pulitzer Prize in 1990. More novels followed, as well as a memoir, but much of that work carried trace elements of the exuberance and melancholy that made Mambo Kings so distinctive.

Hijuelos' sudden in death in 2013 was one of those literary deaths that genuinely seemed to sadden a lot of readers — his work was beloved for, among other things, its sweet, sad take on the allure of dreaming big in America.

Copyright 2015 Fresh Air. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/programs/fresh-air/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

In Patti Smith's new memoir, the "M Train" figures as a Magical Mystery line. She rides it far off into Memoryland, and her snaking Mental trains of thought carry her into reveries on subjects as wide-ranging as her passionate appetite for detective stories and her surprising membership in an elite scientific society devoted to the subject of continental drift.

Writer Jojo Moyes has a name that lacks gravitas. To be honest, I even feel a bit silly saying her name when I recommend her novels to people — which I do, often and energetically. It's hard to imagine a "Jojo" ever winning the Nobel Prize for Literature; but Moyes has already won a pretty good consolation prize — that is, the kind of staunch, adoring readership that will follow her novels anywhere they go.

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